Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/aleche35/boards.sethroberts.net/Sources/Load.php(183) : runtime-created function on line 3
The Non-Addictive Food Diet

sethroberts.net forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Please read The End Game: Shutting Down the Forums in the "News, Polls, Announcements" subforum

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5   Go Down

Author Topic: The Non-Addictive Food Diet  (Read 40296 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Heidi 555

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1675
The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« on: April 29, 2010, 07:55:22 AM »

I have come up with a new diet, which I am going to refer to as the Non-Addictive Food Diet for now.† Here is what Iíve learned so far from following this diet:

1. Addictive foods are much more fattening than non-addictive food.
2. The body responds to addictive food like itís a drug rather than a source of nourishment.
3. Which foods are addictive is unique to each individual.
4. One can do things to shift the level of addiction of a particular food.
5. Addiction can masquerade as intense hunger.
6. A diet that consists primarily of non-addictive food is healthy, nourishing, and satisfying.
7. Itís hard to overeat or gain weight when eating a diet of primarily non-addictive food.
8. The non-addictive food diet when combined with SLD is extraordinarily powerful.

I feel as though I have discovered the missing link that SLD did not address.† Weight loss has been the most effortless that itís ever been in my entire life.† Weight has fallen off easier and quicker than it did during my initial days of SLD.† I suspect that this diet may help others who are stuck at a plateau.† Even though I discovered this diet through the enlightened tasting, I donít think you need to do enlightened tasting to have it work.† However, I do recommend that you do this diet in combination with whatever you are doing for SLD.

The only tricky part is figuring what foods you are addicted to and to what degree.† For me this part is actually fun and enlightening.†

Everything that you eat and drink can be placed into one of three categories:
1. Food that you know is non-addictive, healthy, and nourishing for you
2. Food that you are unsure about or food that may be somewhere in between
3. Food that you know is very addictive for you

For me the beauty of this diet is that you donít have to eliminate all carbohydrate or all sugar Ė just the ones that are most addictive for you.† However, you do have to stay observant and aware in order to figure out for yourself, which foods fall into which category.† If you just start making changes to eat more of the food that you know is not addictive and avoid the food that is most addictive, then over time the rest will become clear.

For me most sugar and sweeteners are very addictive.† However, carrots, beets, molasses, and a lot of fresh fruit is not.† (I havenít had a chance to test out many kinds of fruit yet.)

For me lots of chips, crackers, and bread are very addictive, but different kinds are addictive to different degrees. Whole grain bread is much more addictive for me than white bread. (I donít really like most white bread.† It is still addictive for me, but not to the degree of hearty dense whole grain breads.)† I think that most whole grains if eaten plain are not addictive for me.† (However, I havenít had a chance to test a lot of them out yet.)† If eaten with butter they are more addictive.† If I sweeten them, then they become highly addictive.†

I recently went to a pancake breakfast.† I brought whole ground flaxseed with me.† I ate my pancake with butter and flax, but avoided the maple syrup.† This made the pancake far less addictive than it would have been with the maple syrup.† †

Vegetables even when doused in butter are not addictive for me.† Potatoes doused in butter are very addictive.† But potatoes mixed into soup are not.† Pasta mixed into soup is not addictive.† Eating very small amounts of pasta with lots of vegetables and sauce is okay for me, too.†

Extra sharp cheddar cheese is highly addictive for me, while blue cheese is not.† Melted cheese and cheese sauces are very addictive.† Plain ricotta cheese is fine, but sweetened ricotta cheese is not, even if I sweeten it with a non-caloric sweetener.† Cheesecake and cheese pastries are very big addictions for me.† I recently bought some goat cheese with cranberries and nuts thinking that it would be too strange to be addictive.† Well, I was wrong.† The goat cheese tasted sweet and was very addictive for me.† I suspect that most people would not be addicted to it though.†

Eggs even when cooked in butter are not addictive for me.† But eggs with melted cheese are addictive to a certain degree and so is egg salad.†

Plain cream and all things coconut are addictive for me.† Itís now blatantly obvious why platinum calories would not work for me.†

I rarely drink alcoholic beverages, but I now know why they can sabotage someone's AS (appetite suppression) and most peopleís diet efforts.† The body responds to them as a drug rather than a nutrient source.† I feel that the body responds to food that you are highly addicted to in the same fashion, even if those foods have some nutritional value.

I had no idea that I was addicted to this much food until I did this diet.† I am not overweight and SLD has kept my cravings and eating of addictive food to a bare minimum.† However, I did crave and eat dessert after every meal.† And I regularly ate whole grain bread and creamy things.† Mostly I channeled my cravings into healthier options such as unsweetened chocolate with raisins (thanks to VeganKitten† :) ).† It is only when I tried to give up all addictive food, that the full extent of my food addiction became apparent.† What an eye opener it has been.† Now when I eat food that I am addicted to, I feel a physiological response in my body.† I feel like a drug addict craving a fix.†

I have discovered that when I am tired I am most vulnerable to addictive food.† I crave sugar and carbs then.† A number of times I have come home thinking I was really hungry.† But when I tried to find something healthy and nourishing to eat, none of my non-addictive foods were appealing.† All I wanted was something sweet or starchy.† My body was not actually hungry!† I was astounded to realize that it was a false sense of hunger.† It sure did feel like real hunger to me.† Instead of eating, I did some enlightened tasting and the hunger went away.† I would like to get some L-glutamine to try at those times as well.

Eating non-addictive food has been very pleasurable.† I eat when Iím hungry and the food tastes good.† I eat until I am completely full, satisfied, and content.† I donít feel deprived.† I feel incredibly empowered from the knowledge and changes I am making.† This diet has been more enlightening and healing for me than SLD.† However, I wouldn't have been able to do this diet without combining it with SLD.† SLD has muted my cravings enough so that this kind of experimentation is possible.† When I nose clip an addicted food, it is still addictive but less so.† Nose clipping did not eliminate my addictions, it just muted them.† For me addiction is not completely rooted in the flavor of a food.† It is goes deeper than that.

I feel very motivated to completely heal my life long addiction to food.† I hope to fully decondition my bodyís reaction to addictive food.† Avoiding addictive food doesnít cure the addiction.† Itís too easy to channel the addiction into another food that seems healthier.† I feel like I have the tools to actually heal the addiction, but itís going to take more time and experimentation.
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

Pip

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 83
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2010, 10:57:51 AM »

Wow. Very interesting. Food for thought, so to speak. Thanks for sharing.  :)

There are a couple of things that I find striking about your report. One is that you have made an effort to determine your body's response to many individual foods. I have also come to the conclusion that this needs to be done, but I came at it from the angle of food allergies, which I know I have and run in my family. Interestingly, foods that are allergenic often cause cravings for the very food that you are allergic to.

My experience has also been that food awareness combined with PC (or SLD as the case may be) is very powerful and pretty much makes the cravings go away.

There are links between sleep, serotonin levels and addictions, so it is not surprising to me that you have carb cravings when you are tired.

The second striking thing to me is that you hope to decondition your body's reaction to addictive foods. I will follow your progress if you choose to report back, here or on Todd's site (I'm assuming you plan to use some of Todd's techniques). Good luck!
Logged

TalkingRat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1624
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2010, 12:22:08 PM »

Lots of things to think about.† My first major diet, and quite successful, was the carb addict's diet.† The list of which carbs could be eaten at low carb meals matched up pretty well with my own.† Avoiding reactive carbs made dieting easy, but it was impractical to avoid carbs for a lifetime.†

Potatoes vs. in soup, pasta vs. mixed in vegetables, pancakes with syrup vs. with flaxseed -- that may all point to a glucose response to simple sugars, brought under control by a balance of protein, fat, fiber, and to a lesser extent, low glycemic carbs.† I'm working it from the perspective that glucose control is improved when protein/fat/fiber comes before carbs.† I'm experimenting with more protein, earlier in the day.†

Cream/cheesecake is a trigger for me, too, I think it's the mouth feel of butterfat coating the soft palate.† Coconut milk has a similar mouth feel as dairy.† The effect isn't shut down by noseclipping: alone or in smoothies, where coconut would be noticeable without noseclips, it didn't work noseclipped for me.† But 1 teaspoon coconut oil (or 2T coconut milk) in coffee, where it's coffee that's the main flavor,† gives me AS.†

I think it's more than taste, too.† When butter is cold, it feels like butterfat, but when it's warm, it hits a 'sour center' deep in my sinuses with the same intensity as buttermilk, apple cider vinegar, sourdough.† Maybe that's our attraction to fermentation, it hits that sinus spot.† Dark chocolate has a similar deep sinus sensation.† Whole wheat bread is irresistible about 4 minutes before it's done baking, same for brownies and microwaved popcorn (palm oil).† The intensity is heat-driven.† Maybe caffeine hits the same center.† Smell caffeinated beans vs. decaf - that deep sinus spot wakes up for caffeine.† Whatever is released by heating may be what makes us crave those flavors in their most dominant state, still warm, or roasted, or undiluted by other foods/flavors.

I'm taking a more cognitive path in dealing with cravings, making eating an overtly cognitive process, thinking through my psychological sticking points, and getting my mind out of beta waves.† Judith Beck gives me the framework for the cognitive management of cravings.† Martha Beck's visualization exercises give me the psychological perspective.† Gabriel's audio and other CDs shift me into alpha/theta states (as do Martha's exercises), and adding protein, omega 3, and something live/vibrant/colorful at every meal helps makes the stuff I don't crave pleasurable.

I make the distinction between craving pleasurable foods vs. nutritional cravings.† I can see craving what we're allergic to.† Our bodies recognize allergic symptoms before we do, and if we avoid those foods as long as we can, we're getting deficient in something.† We want them, we have them, our bodies don't like it, and the cycle of avoid/crave repeats.† I ran into an opinion that we crave all foods because of something missing in our diet, and if we can figure out what it is, we can substitute the craving with the missing nutrient. I can't remember where I read it to go find it again, but it would be interesting if somebody has a list of "crave X?† eat Y."

Without bread and bananas, I get less B12 and potassium.† When I cut back on corn, potatoes, rice, and bread, I also eat less butter.†† When I cut milk from my coffee, I no longer add cinnamon.† Increasing fat in my diet has improved hair, skin, mood, triglycerides.†Coconut may have increased my metabolism.†

Reading Gabriel and listening to his podcasts made me consider what's keeping my 'fat switch' on.† I think my problem is sleep deprivation.† I can't get the dog to go out earlier than 11 pm, but she wakes up at 4-5 am.† She's a sweet thing, but I am tired all the time.† I wonder if it's possible to keep her awake all day, so she sleeps more at night.† †:lol:

Logged


Pinkmug

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4323
  • Lisboa Portugal
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2010, 04:05:32 PM »

Interesting! Requires several re-readings thou - not now that my brain is at 17.8%
Logged
A calorie is just a bug that lives in the closet and shrinks your clothes overnight

VeganKitten

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1129
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2010, 05:06:50 PM »

Oh, this makes a lot of sense, Heidi.

Know what?

Raisins + unsweetened dark chocolate has become an addictive food for me! Almost classically so.

Lots of foods would be addictive to me if I ate them, but I don't eat them (candy, pastries, chips, breads, butter and cream or cheese...). But many of the foods that I do eat are addictive to me, sometimes waxing and waning in addictive-ness.

Like I mentioned, I've had a problem with raisins lately; also pumpkin seeds and raw almonds. Raw cacao nibs. Coconut. Peanut butter. Earth balance margarine. Whole wheat pasta with margarine!! Tortillas and all bread (which I limit because I know I'll overeat them given the chance). Dried figs. OMG, under-baked or 'raw' bread dough is super-addictive to me.

Seems to be high-calorie items and sweets mostly -- the ones that I allow myself. And grains, especially any form of bread. And yes, it is a drug-craving feeling. I justify it, believing I can enjoy these things without guilt because they are healthy foods. I'm not eating a ton of calories, but I still gain a hard-to-shift pound or two (not overnight water weight) very easily when I KNOW I haven't consumed 3,500 excess calories.
 
It really resonates when you describe not being hungry for vegetables (for example), yet still being really 'hungry' for something comforting/addictive.

I don't think it's pathological in terms of a personal shortcoming -- I think it's just a fact of human appetite. But fascinating to try to better understand and work with.

I've been at a plateau and am now a couple pounds above even my ticker weight.  :x I really want to get to my goal and maintain. Yet I keep struggling with these few pounds up and down.


For TalkingRat: the importance of good sleep CANNOT be overestimated! Figure out some way to get enough, even if it's just to test it out for a few weeks to see what difference it makes. It's so important. I know it's tough though, I have a cat who is a little alarm clock. Darn beasties!
Logged

Heidi 555

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1675
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2010, 06:04:01 PM »

I also posted this information on Toddís forum. If anyone wants to follow the thread over there hereís the link: http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,24.0.html

Pip, I had been very impressed with your discipline in discovering and eliminating problem foods.† I kept wondering what I should try to eliminate: wheat, dairy, sugar, refined carbs, all carbs, just grain.† It was really confusing to me.† Also, it was too hard to do.† I would try to cut something out and then rebound back to eating it.† The hunger was too intense.

Quote
The second striking thing to me is that you hope to decondition your body's reaction to addictive foods. I will follow your progress if you choose to report back, here or on Todd's site (I'm assuming you plan to use some of Todd's techniques). Good luck!
Maybe Iím being too ambitious, but it doesnít hurt to try.† Todd has great ideas and suggestions, but our processes seem to be leading us to try slightly different techniques.† My personality doesnít do well with rules and scheduling for example.† I need a lot of flow and a feeling of freedom for things to work.†

TalkingRat, youíve always impressed me with your attention to details.† The enlightened tasting has me very aware of the mouth feel and other qualities that you mention.† I wasnít aware of those things in that much detail before.† I think that level of awareness is useful.

Iíve appreciated your posts on the Gabriel Method and hope to download his CD or listen to some of his talks.† Is there anything that best summarizes all his ideas?†

Quote
I make the distinction between craving pleasurable foods vs. nutritional cravings.
Iíve been making a distinction between these too.† Iíve been thinking that cravings for healthy non-addictive food are clear communication of my body telling me what it needs.† Iíve been wondering if craving for addictive food is a breakdown in our bodyís communication system.† Our ancestors didnít have all this highly addictive food.† Now our supermarkets are loaded with it.

Good luck fixing the sleep deprivation.† I think good sleep is really important for lots of things.†

VeganKitten, I could really relate to all of your post, especially this:
Quote
And yes, it is a drug-craving feeling. I justify it, believing I can enjoy these things without guilt because they are healthy foods. I'm not eating a ton of calories, but I still gain a hard-to-shift pound or two (not overnight water weight) very easily when I KNOW I haven't consumed 3,500 excess calories.
†Thatís exactly what happened to me.† However, now I'm redefining healthy food for myself.†

I am hoping that food addiction doesnít have to be a part of the human appetite.† Even though most people have this problem, it doesnít seem like it has to be this way.† Also, Iíve had a lot of success healing relationship addiction issues, and those issues seem even harder to fix.† Having had significant addiction healing in that area, gives me hope that I can transform food addictions as well.
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

August

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 200
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2010, 07:59:11 AM »

I'm a bit concerned about viewing food through the addiction model.
Sure, we don't need the tasty treats we are tempted with now, but  10,000 years ago- in the wild- anything with sugar and/or fat in it would trigger a big fat EAT IT NOW message regardless of relative hunger levels.  From what I remember, we spent at least 1/3 of the time in a calorie deficit and had no refrigeration, so it just made sense from a biological perspective to eat until whatever it was was gone. 

It's only now, with calories so freely available everywhere that this behavior causes problems.  We've got to fool with blunting our appetite because we are not in the environment that appetite was attuned to, not because we are addicted. 

Your experiments yield good insights under both models; it's only that with an addiction viewpoint there is a sense of conflict between body and mind.  With an 'ancestral' viewpoint we can have cooperation and integration between body and mind.  Think of nose-clipping, for instance, as modifying the environment rather than tricking the body, for it doesn't make any sense that the body would want to be obese or infirm. 
Logged

VeganKitten

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1129
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2010, 09:35:22 AM »

Modern foods have been engineered to exploit innate, ancient taste preferences. In other words, modern food (especially snack foods and sodas, stuff with high profit margin) has been designed to be as "addictive" as possible. I'm not sure if addiction is a sickness, or a not-unexpected physiological response to substances we were never meant to ingest (in cases like hard drugs or HFCS for example).

Or not meant to ingest in the quantities we have today... early man may have found honey (concentrated source of sugar), fermented fruit (alcohol) and psychoactive plants, but they weren't available in unlimited quantities and heavily advertised 24 hours a day.

Interesting perspectives to think about!
Logged

Heidi 555

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1675
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2010, 05:03:51 AM »

Interesting point August, about thinking in terms of modifying the environment.† Maybe thinking that way will give me some new ideas.† The environment that I most need to alter is the social party/family one that has lots of decadent food temptations.† Fortunately that environment is not the norm for me.

Iím using the word addiction to refer to the physiological response that my body has to certain foods.† It is fascinating to me that certain foods trigger what I believe is a similar brain chemistry as drugs and other addictive substances.† I think that triggering that kind of physiological response with food makes the food much more fattening, or makes losing weight much more challenging.† I like beets with sour cream or Greek yogurt.† But they donít trigger that physiological response for me.† Yet sweetened ricotta cheese does (but not as much as cheesecake or cheese pastry).†

I donít view myself as having a sickness or disease.† In terms of addiction I am very fortunate.† I have never had an interest in alcohol, smoking, coffee, tea, etc.† I experimented with drugs (mostly in my younger days) and had powerful experiences that were spiritually meaningful to me.† Working with food addiction is really interesting.† Right now Iím much more emotionally attached to being and staying thin, than I am to any particular food item.†

So far the enlightened tasting experiments in conjunction with this diet have been successful in shifting my cravings for certain foods.† I think that the physiological response to addictive foods is conditioned.† Iím hopeful that I can reverse that conditioning.† So far so good.†
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

TalkingRat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1624
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2010, 04:37:04 PM »

Heidi, I haven't seen any summaries of Gabriel's ideas.† But I'd suggest you start with the audio visualization.† The alpha/theta waves may be a large part of what makes his approach successful.† The brain waves help with sleep and stress reduction, as does the omega3 he recommends.† I got his book The Gabriel Method from the library.† The podcast called my attention to my sleep deprivation, but the podcasts were annoying.† Gabriel and the radio host continually interrupt with "uh huh" (Gabriel) or "wow" (host), and the disruption was compounded by the audio delay.† They also had no skill in cueing a caller when to start talking.†

Gabriel suggests people are fat because our body wants us to be fat.† Our body has turned on the 'fat switch'† in order to protect us.† The switch may be broken when it sends out the 'eat' message, but that's what we respond to, it's not that we want to do harm or sabotage ourselves.† When we diet, the body tries even harder to store fat, sensing famine and food restriction.† To shut off the switch, we need to find out why our body thinks we need protection.† Gabriel uses visualization with alpha/theta brainwaves to help people give the body messages that being thin is ok, and that they are safe.† In his book, he has a long list of stressors (sleep disruption, toxins, nutritional deficiency, allergies, indigestion, surgery, trauma, emotional stress) that keep the fat switch on, and when we know what's keeping the switch on, we can figure out how to shut it off.† The nutritional aspect for Gabriel seems to be eating organic and unprocessed, but he does it in small steps, starting with:† at every meal,† add protein, omega 3 (multiple sources) and something live/organic/green/vibrant.† Throughout the day, get adequate hydration -- modern foods have a lower water content, and we can't quench our thirst with food like we did long ago.

Thank you, VeganKitten and Heidi -- for the little push to get me to face my sleep problem.† I had a terrible plan, I was just going to wait until DS was home and we could take shifts with the dog.† :roll:† †I'm going to bed an hour earlier, and feeding her much later, so her after dinner trip outside is the bedtime trip, and I don't have to do battle to get her to go at bedtime.† She has arthritis, so I haven't kenneled her for years, but I need a way to confine her to the carpet.† I think she barks in the early morning because she moves onto the hardwood floor and after she's been there a few hours, she's stuck.†
Logged


fbnops

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 80
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2010, 11:16:56 AM »

Quote
It really resonates when you describe not being hungry for vegetables (for example), yet still being really 'hungry' for something comforting/addictive.

That is well said, I know that feeling!

The most outstanding thing about my few months experience with the oil is losing that feeling.† At mealtime I am no longer craving pizza or fried chicken.† A vegetable (non-starchy) and a little bread or meat sounds just as good as a barbecue dinner.
Logged

TalkingRat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1624
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2010, 01:00:15 PM »

I have been thinking about the sinus sensation for my addictive foods, and wondered if I could make an attractive flavor less attractive by overpowering it with another flavor.† The last couple days, I've been eating cashews even when I wasn't hungry.† The calories add up quickly.† So today I experimented with reducing my attraction to roasted cashews by overpowering it with coffee.† I sucked on a single cashew.† I knew it would be salty, but I was surprised that when I didn't chew it right away, the salt overpowered the roasted cashew taste.† All I tasted was salt, and when the salt was gone, the cashew still didn't taste like a roasted cashew.† Next, I sipped coffee, cashew intact.† I chewed the cashew slowly, sipping more coffee every time it started to taste like a roasted cashew.† Cashews that taste like coffee are not appealing.† † :lol:† †I had two more cashews over the next 10 minutes.† I waited another ten minutes and smelled the cashew carton.† It smelled like yummy roasted cashews, but when I thought about how the 'new' flavor tasted, the attraction faded.† Not only did I not want another coffee flavored cashew, I felt full and not ready for lunch.† Haven't finished the coffee either -- maybe I killed two birds with one stone.†
Logged


Heidi 555

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1675
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2010, 04:29:26 AM »

TalkingRat, thanks so much for the summary of some of Gabrielís ideas.† I feel very much aligned with and mostly already do his dietary suggestions.† Also, itís a good idea to alleviate as many stressors as we can just for general wellbeing.† Iíll download his audio visualization when I get a chance.

Great post on the cashews and coffee combining!† Iíve wanted to do more things like that.† I was inspired by how you took your time with the experimentation.† I think that eating something slowly and really paying attention to the subtle nuances of taste is helpful for deconditioning flavors.† We tend to eat junk food really fast.† Doing the enlightened tasting has me much more aware of the myriad components that make a food pleasurable and addictive.†

My husband and I have continually had to come up with creative ideas to prevent our cat from waking us up in the morning.† Our most recent solution is a barrier in the hallway so that he canít access the bedroom door.† He loves to wail on the doorknob and make a huge racket.† Sometimes he manages to open the door.† Then we get this huge weight bounding on top of us, or a wet nose or paw batting us in the face.† I hope that you're able to find a successful solution with your dog.
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

TalkingRat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1624
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2010, 08:58:07 AM »

There's not much choice with how one eats a single cashew and makes it last.† :lol:† At the first tiny chip off the edge, a flood of flavor was released, so that made it important to go slowly -- to control the flavor.† †Wow, the AS afterward was amazing.† I left the carton on the counter for the rest of the day, that's how strong AS was.† When I had coffee later, I opened the lid and smelled cashews between sips of coffee.†The calorie-free method seemed quite effective, too -- the coffee cut out the sinus sensation of the cashew's smell almost immediately.† AS is still strong this morning.

I'm definitely making progress on the sleep problem.† The dog started fussing at 5:30 today, but I waited half an hour before going downstairs.† I need to train both of us to sleep longer.† The next step is to make the bedroom room totally dark, which Gabriel suggests for more restful sleep.†

I'd been having fishoil as SLD calories, but the last few days I've been taking 2 at each meal, as well as having flaxseed.
Logged


Heidi 555

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1675
Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2010, 02:36:20 PM »

TalkingRat, many thanks for pointing me to the Gabriel audio visualization.† Iíve listened to many hypnosis or visualization recordings and his is especially good.† Iíve been enjoying it in terms of relaxation and help with sleeping.† I donít really need it for weight loss as Iím back to my goal weight, but it is very affirming.† Iíve been trying to find some other relaxation recordings that I like.† Iíd also like to find the time to make my own.† I use to do that.† Making your own tapes that are specifically tailored to your personal issues is very empowering.† It might be good to start a thread on the Gabriel Method as many people here have been inspired by it.†

My non-addictive diet explorations have continued to go well.† So far the best benefit has been the enormously enhanced self-awareness around food addiction.† Itís been fascinating to observe exactly when and how my food addictions arise.†

My addiction tends to break down into two components: a craving for something sweet or a craving for something starchy and filling.† Mild cravings are easy to deal with, but strong cravings are more of a challenge.† Strong cravings for starchy carbs do not go away if I ignore them, and manifest as intense hunger.† The enlightened tasting does relieve them.† I havenít had any really strong cravings this past week or so.† Iím hopeful that that level of withdrawal type symptoms is starting to subside.†

Even though Iíve done a lot of deconditioning around the flavors of many foods, the physiological addiction can be so strong that I still want the food for its sweetness and texture, even though the treat doesnít taste as good as it use to.

Iíve been a bit looser with this diet than when I first started it.† But my level of awareness and consciousness around what Iím doing and why remains high.† When I eat a piece of bread or a dessert, I observe and remain mindful of the entire addictive context.† I think that this level of observation and awareness is immensely healing.† Iím no longer at the mercy of unconscious and uncontrollable urges.† Thereís a feeling like Iím gently unraveling something that is deeply rooted in childhood and infancy.† Iím aware of the connections.

Seth wrote a great blog post on a woman using a two pronged approach to quit smoking. http://www.blog.sethroberts.net/2010/05/01/new-way-to-quit-smoking/ † This womanís approach to quitting smoking is identical to what Iím doing with food.† It was very affirming that this two prong method could be applied to other addictions.† The two things together are much more powerful than either one by itself.† I thought that it could also be applied to addictions such as drinking and coffee.† For example, someone could drink a non-alcoholic beer like beverage and nose clip the actual beer, or drink decaffeinated coffee and take a separate caffeine pill.

Someone could also do the non-addictive diet with a different combination of techniques than what Iím using.† For example, taking oil could be substituted for the nose clipping and Toddís deconditioning diet could be substituted for the enlightened tasting.† But I think that a two prong approach is more powerful and thus more helpful for people with strong physiological addictions.†
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5   Go Up
 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18