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The Non-Addictive Food Diet

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Author Topic: The Non-Addictive Food Diet  (Read 38512 times)

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Heidi 555

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #60 on: April 25, 2011, 07:40:47 AM »

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It is not so popular that it is too late to change the name ....

lol, it is probably one of the most unpopular dietary tools ever!  Most people have a terrible reaction to it.  I think that its chances of becoming popular are about nil. The few people who know that I do it are sworn to secrecy about it.  Very few people are interested in trying it.  I usually just refer to it as ďtaste and spitĒ.  Iím open to calling it something else if you or anyone else has any good ideas.  It definitely could use a name that spruces up its image a bit, because its image is so low.

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In any case what about the possibility that the enlightened tasting helped because it caused you to eat less junk food? Less junk food, less worms.

Well I didnít eat much junk food to begin with.  But I did come to the conclusion that the food I was addicted to was actually the food that the worms were addicted to.  Lots of food that is non-addictive is food that may be harmful to them in some way.

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Because the junk food was so calorie-rich, the calories in them survived further into the digestive process -- that is, further into your intestines. Whereas with ordinary food, most of the calories are removed early.

That is an interesting idea, but most non-addictive food is high in fiber.  Wouldnít the fiber slow down the digestion of the food and the removal of calories?  Also some calorie rich food such as fish, fish oil, and flax is not addictive and okay.

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someone should create a website where we can nominate people for Stupidest Doctor in America. . . . Not being able to realize that a worm is a worm is egregious.
I find myself more exasperated by the system than the individual doctors.  The system seems incredibly stupid and backward with regards to parasites.  Most doctors have blind trust in the system.  They canít think outside of the box.  If the lab tests say that it isnít a worm, well then by golly it must be something else.  They are unable to consider the possibility that the labs might be wrong.
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

Seth Roberts

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #61 on: April 25, 2011, 03:28:51 PM »

By "junk food" I meant the food to which you were addicted. I should have called it "addictive food".

I agree, it is the system that is at fault, but the system consists of individuals. Including individual doctors. I wonder what your doctor would have said if you asked why he trusted the lab results. A surgeon once told me I should get a certain surgery. The evidence, she said, showed I would benefit. I couldn't find the evidence and asked her for it. She said she would find it for me and never did. I blogged about this. She got upset. That was revealing and helpful, I think.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2011, 05:12:53 PM by Seth Roberts »
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NTB

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #62 on: April 25, 2011, 05:06:51 PM »

I have passed ridiculous numbers of Ascaris lumbricoides in all stages of decay, except for alive and mint condition.  The evidence in the toilet is not a hallucination. (A five-year-old child could easily identify an intact ascaris specimen as a worm.)  I have had my husband and also a close friend examine the parasite material that I have passed.  They both agree that I am passing just one kind of parasite in a huge range of stages of decay.  My husband jokes that I should collect the evidence in a bucket and bring it to the doctors. 

Hi Heidi,

Your travails are riveting. I've been away from the SLD forum for a while but I have set an "alert" on a few threads of particular interest.  Your story is not only a personal interest story that could easily grace the pages of the New York Times Magazine or a Malcolm Gladwell column in the New Yorker--but I think it rises to the worthiness of an illustrative example for a parasitology article in Scientific American or Nature.  It is hard to get out of one's mind.

I think your husband's suggestion is not a mere joke. Why don't you collect a "specimen" and bring it to the doctors?  And if the local yokels aren't perceptive enough, persist and dirve a some additional miles to a university medical center that has a good parasitology department.

One additional thought:  Sometimes the solution to an "infection" (which parasite infestation is) is not chemical warfare (antiobiotics) or starvation (removing the favored substrate) but rather competition (introducing a competitive parasite, bacterium or other intestinal microbe).  Perhaps there are "probiotic" approaches to crowding out those long little buggers by introducing a more biocompatible parasite.  I've read that helminthic therapy -- introducing innocuous parasites -- helps people overcome allergies which are due to how the immune system overreacts when the IgE immune response is underdeveloped.  The preferred parasite species is Necator americanus (commonly known as hookworms) or Trichuris suis.  These parasites are relatively innocuous -- at least they don't drain you of energy.  What about using helminthic therapy to deliberately infect yourself with competitor to Acaris lumbricoides, driving it out and overtaking its niche in your intestines? 

You've probably considered this, but if so, I'm interested in hearing what you've learned.

Good luck.  And enjoy the spring after the long New England winter!

Todd
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Heidi 555

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #63 on: April 27, 2011, 04:45:32 PM »

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Your travails are riveting. I've been away from the SLD forum for a while but I have set an "alert" on a few threads of particular interest. Your story is not only a personal interest story that could easily grace the pages of the New York Times Magazine or a Malcolm Gladwell column in the New Yorker--but I think it rises to the worthiness of an illustrative example for a parasitology article in Scientific American or Nature. It is hard to get out of one's mind.
Thanks Todd, but I was thinking it seems more like a bad horror flick.  My story is very common on parasite forums.

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I think your husband's suggestion is not a mere joke. Why don't you collect a "specimen" and bring it to the doctors? And if the local yokels aren't perceptive enough, persist and drive a some additional miles to a university medical center that has a good parasitology department.
My husband was suggesting that I collect a large volume of parasite material.  I have brought specimens to doctors.  They glance at them briefly through the bag and container.  They donít look at them closely.  My parents desperately want me to travel to a university medical center.  However, so many people on the parasite forums have been to infectious disease specialists and not been helped.  Since my energy levels have been compromised, Iíve chosen to just treat myself for now.  It is extremely easy and relatively inexpensive to get parasite meds online.  My self-treatment has been going well so far.  If I get stuck, then Iíll make another stab at getting medical help.  

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One additional thought: Sometimes the solution to an "infection" (which parasite infestation is) is not chemical warfare (antiobiotics) or starvation (removing the favored substrate) but rather competition (introducing a competitive parasite, bacterium or other intestinal microbe). Perhaps there are "probiotic" approaches to crowding out those long little buggers by introducing a more biocompatible parasite. I've read that helminthic therapy -- introducing innocuous parasites -- helps people overcome allergies which are due to how the immune system overreacts when the IgE immune response is underdeveloped. The preferred parasite species is Necator americanus (commonly known as hookworms) or Trichuris suis. These parasites are relatively innocuous -- at least they don't drain you of energy. What about using helminthic therapy to deliberately infect yourself with competitor to Acaris lumbricoides, driving it out and overtaking its niche in your intestines?
If only there was very clear knowledge that certain beneficial parasites competed with ascaris.  Most people who have the worm loads that I have, typically have multiple kinds.  I suspect that various parasites reinforce each other in not so beneficial ways.  There is even a type of parasite that thrives on probiotics.  

I thought about fecal implants, which are being used with great success for Clostridium Difficile infections.  (It would be a natural next step for me to continue to escalate the gross factor. :o )  I was amazed at how fast one implant could transform gut flora.  (See: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/science/13micro.html?_r=1) But it seems like something to try only if youíre desperately sick and nothing else is working.  Iíve never heard of it being done for parasites.  More research on people who have good gut ecology and what can be done to transform bad gut ecology is needed.  I think that good gut ecology is probably key to good health and easy weight loss.

I am working on a probiotic approach by consuming large quantities of cultured vegetables.  Iím hesitant to take much yogurt or kefir because the parasites especially love milk.  Iíve been thinking about making pumpkinseed kefir or kombucha brewed with antiparasite herbs.

I also intended to post an update about my non-addictive diet on your forum.  But this update ended up being parasite focused and somewhat off topic.  It seemed more appropriate to just post my parasite saga on this forum because of my long history here.

However, Iíve been thrilled to see that your forum is doing so well.  (If anyone here hasnít checked it out, I highly recommend it.  Itís loaded with great info and Toddís articles are excellent.  See: http://www.gettingstronger.org/ and http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php)

Have you seen this article on parasite infection and immune responses in M.S.?  Iíd been meaning to e-mail you the link.  I actually haven't read it but I thought you would be into it. http://www.direct-ms.org/pdf/HygieneMS/Parasite%20infection%20MS%20Annals%20Neur%2007.pdf

Thanks again Todd.  As always it's great to converse with you.
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

Seth Roberts

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #64 on: April 27, 2011, 05:29:30 PM »

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It seemed more appropriate to just post my parasite saga on this forum because of my long history here.

And I am glad you have. it's really interesting and instructive.
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Heidi 555

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #65 on: July 28, 2012, 01:48:49 PM »

Okay, so the strange formatting in a long narrow box seems to show up just on my first post.  Maybe it's punishment for not posting in a long time. lol!  I'm not sure if this post appears to others that way.  And what to do to fix it.  It looks fine on the recent post page.  I moved my long update post below this one and now that looks fine.  I flagged Seth about it.  But I think I fixed the problem because my "real" post looks okay now.  But if anyone else has this problem or knows more about it feel free to chime in.  Thanks.
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

Heidi 555

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #66 on: July 28, 2012, 02:01:10 PM »

Hey all old and new Shangri-la Diet friends.  Hope everyone is doing well.  And hope that each of you make steady gradual progress towards your weight loss goals. 

Iíve been meaning to post an update on my long and crazy journey.  I am doing well.  Itís taken two years of intensive parasite cleansing, but Iím finally starting to feel better!  (Knock-wood that it continues!!!)  Iím still in the throes of parasite cleansing, but am passing what appears to me to be a much older layer of parasite buildup.  Iíve been taking lemon, lime, and V8 style vegetable juices to break down and dissolve that layer.  I also drink really tasty kombucha that I brew, and eat lots of fermented vegetables that I culture.  My husband did an enormous garden this year.  So the bulk of my diet consists of very fresh veggies and wild edible weeds.  My diet is extremely healthy.  No grains, no sweeteners (except stevia), no junk food, no processed food, and only occasional small amounts of low fat cultured dairy.

Tasting and spitting really helped to cut my food addiction to manageable levels, but has not eliminated it entirely as Iíd hoped.  It seems as though thereís an endless amount of food to decondition and each individual food takes time. (Itís also hard for me to know how much of my food addiction is due to parasites.)  Iíve learned a lot through two years of tasting and spitting.  For example, dark chocolate is an incredibly addictive food substance for me.  I use to like milk chocolate more but that was much easier to decondition.  I know dark chocolate is supposed to have lots of good healing properties, but Iíve come to the conclusion that it is really not good for me.  Iíd be relieved to never desire it again.

So taste and spit is a replacement addiction that moved me in the right direction, but Iím ready to be done with it.  It might be too soon to completely wean myself from it.  But I am feeling weary of it, which is a good sign!  I have been gradually attempting to cut back for a few months now.  Iím feeling my way with it.  I have more stress in my life at the moment, and that always makes addiction elimination trickier.  If I cut back too drastically, it seems like I rebound back into overwhelming cravings.  So Iím trying to move steadily in the direction of weaning myself, without being too extreme.  Even though Iíd like to be completely done with it, I probably need to still do it to a lessor degree for awhile. 

Since Iíve been attempting to cut back on tasting and spitting, Iíve increased my consumption of calorie free flavors (CFF).  I drink a lot of different flavors of herbal tea sweetened with stevia.  CFF is an extremely helpful component of SLD that tends to be overlooked.

When I first started the non-addictive diet and parasite cleansing, I gained back about half of the weight that Iíd lost on SLD.  But then I managed to hold my weight steady.  And then gradually and incrementally Iíve pushed my weight back down.  I am now happily below my goal weight, but scale weight is deceptive!  My body composition is now more fat and less muscle.  So I am a pant size higher than what I was two years ago when I achieved and maintained my goal. 

Ideally I would love to build back the muscle that I had then.  Iím finally feeling well enough to increase the intensity of my exercise, but I also just started a new job and so my time has been more limited.  Also, my muscle development a few years ago was from jogging.  Iím not sure that my body can sustain the stress of that kind of high impact repetitive exercise. 

Iím still hooping a lot and loving it!  My skills keep steadily increasing.  Recently, I felt a shift like my core muscles had gotten even stronger.  Having a stronger core is an incredible feeling! 

In general, Iíve been much more relaxed about the whole weight and exercise thing.  I feel confident that Iíll be able to get to and maintain my ideal weight and body composition once again.  Steady and persistent is the way.  I know the rhythm of maintaining and consolidating gains.  After awhile, my body will make another incremental shift of dropping a few pounds or building some muscle.  I can feel that my body/set-point are dependably moving in the right direction.  I have a much deeper understanding and knowledge of weight loss and addiction issues, then when I started SLD many years ago.  Iím attuned to and working with my body, itís rhythms, and the rhythms of my life.  I trust my body and the weight loss process.  Itís a nice feeling to have trust!  But I also want to stay humble, because thereís always unexpected changes and more to learn.

Also, just for the record I am no longer nose clipping (except for some foul tasting parasite meds).  I still live by and follow SLD principles.  But I am now able to get to and maintain a good weight without nose clipping, oil slugging, or sugar water.  And hopefully soon without tasting and spitting. (My husband thinks that the tasting and spitting large quantities of addictive foods contributed to my weight gain.  He might be right.  I havenít been entirely sure about this.  I know I needed it as an in between step and that the level of my cravings has been greatly reduced by doing it.  But the process of tasting lots of flavors of highly addictive food might have a counterproductive element to it as well. ) 

For me the flavor of addictive foods is what drives the addiction cycle and weight gain.  One doesnít need to eat a completely bland or flavorless diet in order to lose weight.  Some of the foods that I eat and enjoy are spicy and flavorful, BUT those foods do not create an addictive reaction in my body. 

Identifying and cutting back the foods that are addictive to my body has been key.  Plain whole grain bread, plain crackers, potatoes, butter, and cream are examples of very bland foods that have an addictive reaction in my body.  It is best for me not to consume them.  Itís been a long, long time since Iíve had a good sandwich.  I crave a good sandwich, potatoes, butter, cream, goat cheese, and very dark chocolate more than I crave junk food.  Addiction is subtle.  There are lots of healthy good foods that my body responds to like an addict.  This has been the most eye-opening part of this long and crazy journey for me.  Addiction is personal and unique to each personís body.  I was completely unaware of how addicted I was to certain foods simply because I believed that those foods were healthy and good for me.  I still believe that those foods are healthy and good for many people, but I now know beyond any doubt that they are not good for me.  What a relief it is to be in touch with clear dietary knowledge that comes from within, instead of following an external authority.  Self-knowledge and empowerment have been the priceless gifts and rewards of this journey. 

Perhaps somewhere down the road when all parasites have been eliminated, Iíll be able to consume some of these foods once again.  Who knows?  Iím not sure what kind of crazy twist or turn is coming next.  Iíll just have to wait and see.



Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.

shovelqueen

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #67 on: July 29, 2012, 05:43:48 AM »

Well, Hello, Heidi!  Wonderful to hear from you.  I still read these forums, though they have been quite quiet of late.  Don't post much.  I still use the oil shots on occasion, not regularly. 

I have transitioned over to a mostly Primal way of eating in the past year.  It avoids most grains, legumes, processed and junk foods.  I feel so much better off of grains.  I'm also not running any more, just sort of lost interest in it.

I'm so glad that you are doing well and feeling so at peace in your body.  All the best!

SQ
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Heidi 555

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Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
« Reply #68 on: July 29, 2012, 04:35:23 PM »

Hi SQ,

Nice to catch up with you, too!  Our years of doing SLD and exercise challenges together have made a lasting impact.  It sounds like our diets are similar now, though I eat some legumes.  I'm surprised to hear that you lost interest in running.  I've done 3 short jogs in the last week or two.  They felt good so far.  With running I feel more prone to injury, and at 50 years of age it's important to me to steer clear of that.  Are you doing any other types of exercise? 

I miss all the old regular posters.  I wish that there was some way to have a reunion.  I felt bonded with the group here.  It seems like Numpty is the main person continuing the forum's momentum and inspiration now.

Wishing you all the best as well.

Heidi
Logged
It took 1 year of nose clipping
to lose 20 pounds (from about 140 to 120)
Dropped from size 8-10 to size 4
I'm 5' 4.5"

Read about my success nose clipping regular food instead of doing oil or sugar: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=5903.
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