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NTB

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Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« on: February 13, 2010, 11:29:26 am »

I've been experimenting over the past 3 weeks with using a blood glucose monitor to learn about what makes me tick, and a few friends and family members have also taken part in this study.  I know that several others on these pages (jbird, Heidi555 and phoebe) have shown an interest in this approach so I thought I would share a few things that I've learned, and some suggestions for others who might want to self-experiment.

First, some caveats: I am not a diabetic, not were any of my friends who tested this. So if you are diabetic, only some or none of this may apply. And I am not a doctor, so take any advice given here at your own risk, or check with your doctor before proceeding.

Insulin and glucose. A number of us on this site subscribe to the view that insulin levels are important in regulating weight and appetite. (See the Appetite Suppression vs. Setpoint Adjustment thread for more details). Ideally, we would like to be able to measure blood insulin directly but, alas, home blood insulin meters are not yet available.  I've had my basal insulin level measured during my annual physicals and it is very good.  I was at 10uU/ml a year ago, but after 6 months of low carb, intermittent fasting, appetite deconditioning and high intensity exercise and am now down to 4 uU/ml insulin.

The problem is that occasional basal insulin measurements don't tell you the hour-by-hour story of what is happening to your insulin.  And basal insulin also doesn't tell you whether or not you are insulin resistant -- which is the other half of the story, and probably what really is the driver behind high insulin levels and the risk of diabetes.

But inexpensive blood glucose meters are available and, with a little cleverness, we can use them to indirectly tell us what is going on with our insulin.

What to buy. Many makes and styles are available.  I was able to buy a Freestyle Lite at Walgreen's Pharmacy for $19. The Freestyle uses the smallest pinprick drop of blood, smaller than any other make.  That makes it almost painless, which is important if you are going to be taking 4 or 5 samples a day. The technology has improved so much, that you barely feel anything in taking the miniscule pinprick blood sample. 

The glucose test strips are expensive if you buy them in the drugstore (without a prescription), but from Amazon I was able to order a container of 50 test strips for $26. That's good enough for a week of experiments, enough for you to learn how your blood sugar responds to diet and exercise.  So if you are willing to invest $50-100 in this experiment, that's not too bad...or, you could just ask a diabetic friend to let you try a few test strips.

Preliminary results of experiments. I've learned a lot in the last few weeks, but I'll try to boil it down to the highlights:

1. Time. It really does take a long time for blood glucose levels to return to baseline.  In my case, baseline is usually about 90-100 mg/dl, occasionally below 80, and occasionally above 110.  After a meal, it can take 2-4 hours to get back to baseline.
2. High carb. After a high carb meal, my glucose goes up quickly to about 140-150, then falls back to about 120 for 2-3 hours, and make take as much as 4 hours to get back to baseline.  This reflects the well-known 2-phase insulin response;  the cephalic or pre-prandial phase controls the blood sugar to no more than 140-150, then the slower postprandial phase brings it back to baseline over several hours.
3. Insulin resistance. For some people (like my friend), blood glucose was slower to respond to the hi carb meal,  but kept increasing to above 190 mg/dL even 2 hours after the meal! And at the same time, my friend became hungry and tired when her blood glucose was that high. That is a clear indication of insulin resistance.  What is means is that the insulin receptors on the glucose transporters in the tissues are not responding to the high insulin levels...so glucose is not getting into the tissues, and she is actually "starving" even with all that glucose around.  Not a good sign.  And that is why many of the carboholics on this site paradoxically get hungry the more carbs they eat...the glucose and high insulin are shutting down the glucose transporters, make them ravenous.  If you think this sounds like you...do the experiment to confirm this.
4. Low carb. After a low carb meal, my glucose level barely goes up over baseline!  It's amazing...low carb really does control blood insulin.
5. Exercise. Immediately after strrenuous exercise, like a one-hour run, my glucose goes up between 10-40 units, very quickly! But then it comes down quickly, within an hour, to 10-20 units below the pre-exercise level.  So, net, exercise reduces my blood glucose.  The rise may seem paradoxical, but I think it means that adrenaline and glucagon are breaking down glycogen in the muscles to release glucose for energy.  That is good!
6. Sleep. After sleeping, in the morning, my glucose is typically 10-20 units lower than the night before.  If it was 110 at bedtime, it is 90 in the morning. And this is always associated with losing about 2-3 pounds weight overnight.
7. Coconut oil. Now here is one of the strangest things I found, though now it makes sense to me.  Coconut oil causes blood sugar to drop -- and fast!  Every time I've tested it, CO drops blood sugar by 10-20 units!  And I can even get my blood sugar to 70 or 80 (which might normally be a sign of "hypoglycemia") while feeling fully energized.  Furthermore, CO always increases my energy, but it actually creates a "wired" or adrenaline like feeling if I take it when my blood sugar at baseline.  So if I take it at 90, my blood glucose drops to 70 or 80, and  I get the adrenaline. This is because with the MCT fatty acids in your bloodstream, your liver acts to clear "unneeded" blood glucose, by shunting it back to glycogen stores.  (Otherwise you would have "too much" energy).  I have also read that CO transiently increases insulin levels (in order to lower glucose levels in compensation for the extra fatty acids in the bloodstream), although this is temporary because CO is known to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse symptoms of insulin resistance.  So here is one case where it is GOOD to raise insulin, temporarily.  If you raise insulin for short spurts when your blood glucose is low, you are increasing the sensitivity of your insulin receptors, helping to reverse insulin resistance!
8. Other fats and oils. Interestingly, heavy cream or other fats had NO effect on blood glucose. This corresponds well to my subjective experience that they are satiating, but not energizing.
9. Blood glucose and weight loss. I have found that I lose weight ONLY when my glucose is kept below 100 mg/dL.  Since it typically takes 4 hours after a big meal for the glucose to get down this low, this proves the importance of a fasting "window" after eating in order to lose weight.  Furthermore, I have found that if I go to bed after a big meal, with high glucose (120 or higher) then I lose NO weight in the morning.  This reinforces the importance of not eating big dinners or desserts late at night...cut off your eating by 7 or 8  p.m. and allow your blood glucose to come down before going to bed.
10. Hunger. I found very little correlation between "hunger" and blood glucose.  Actually, the one association I found was that hunger comes BEFORE a drop in blood glucose.  If I was every hungry, I would measure my blood glucose and it was the same...but 30 minutes later, it had dropped 10-20 units. So hunger causes a drop in blood sugar, but not the other way around This seems to confirm my hypothesis about pre-prandial insulin and hunger.  The thought of hunger...drives insulin up...which drives glucose down.  But this plays out in time, and the earlier event must be the cause of the later event. A dose of CO or platinum calories fixed the hunger...by driving glucose temporarily even LOWER, which then turned on glucagon and adrenaline to restore homeostasis.  Very interesting!
11. Fasting. During an experiment last week of not eating for 48 hours, my blood glucose remained within a narrow window of 83-101 mg/L the entire time. During fasting, I had only water or herb tea. Once, I had a little low energy, took 2 tbsp of CO, and that boosted my energy (after dropping my glucose to 75 briefly).

I'm still learning a lot, but if anything, the blood glucose measuring experiments have convinced me that weight loss occurs only during times when blood sugar is kept low -- less than about 100 mg/dL.  And I did not necessarily get hungry when it was as lower than 100. The one time it was very low (80) and I was hungry, CO came to the rescue by freeing up more glucose from my glycogen. So hunger seems to have a life of its own, driven by psychology, and our physiology (insulin and weight loss) follow our psychology, not the other way around.  Most interesting.

Here's a thought: if you are constantly eating throughout the day and your blood sugar never drops below 100...or even 120 -- is it possible to lose weight?

So...There are a lot of questions to be asked, tested, and answered. I would be interested to have others post their experiences on this thread.

Good Luck!

Todd


 
« Last Edit: February 22, 2010, 12:41:30 pm by NTB »
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Heidi 555

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2010, 06:05:31 pm »

Thanks for this excellent post Todd (as well as all your other informative posts).  It was just the kind of specifics that I'd been wanting to learn about.  I'm not sure how much money I want to invest in this.  I might try to see if a diabetic friend or relative could get me some test strips. Or maybe the next time I see my doctor I could convince him to write me a prescription. 
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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2010, 06:51:26 pm »

wow ... I've been looking at buying one too 

A lot of the subjective experiences you describe match my subjective experiences under the same conditions (fasting energy), but I have not matched my experiences to blood sugar readings yet ...

7. Coconut oil. Now here is one of the strangest things I found, though now it makes sense to me.  Coconut oil causes blood sugar to drop

Do you know if your brand of coconut oil has any ferulic acid?

Virgin cold pressed coconut oil should have a little. 
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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2010, 06:55:53 pm »

thanks a LOT for posting your experiences

10. Hunger. I found very little correlation between "hunger" and blood glucose.  Actually, the on association I found was that hunger comes BEFORE a drop in blood glucose.  If I was every hungry, I would measure my blood glucose and it was the same...but 30 minutes later, it had dropped 10-20 units. So hunger causes a drop in blood sugar, but not the other way around This seems to confirm my hypothesis about


Do you eat at the same time every day?

http://leangains.blogspot.com/2009/08/ghrelin-and-entrained-meal-patterns.html
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NTB

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2010, 07:44:49 pm »

Do you know if your brand of coconut oil has any ferulic acid?  Virgin cold pressed coconut oil should have a little. 

I've been using Spectrum brand, expeller pressed organic coconut oil. I couldn't find any mention of ferulic acid on their website:
http://www.spectrumorganics.com/?id=247#j46
While I don't know about Spectrum, I did find this interesting article about the antioxidant properties of ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid in virgin coconut oils:
http://www.spectrumorganics.com/?id=247#j46

Do you eat at the same time every day?

I probably eat dinner more than other meals, but I most definitely do not eat at the same times every day...I tend to mix it up a fair bit.
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bleeding

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2010, 08:18:02 pm »

Do you know if your brand of coconut oil has any ferulic acid?  Virgin cold pressed coconut oil should have a little. 

I've been using Spectrum brand, expeller pressed organic coconut oil. I couldn't find any mention of ferulic acid on their website:
http://www.spectrumorganics.com/?id=247#j46
While I don't know about Spectrum, I did find this interesting article about the antioxidant properties of ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid in virgin coconut oils:
http://www.spectrumorganics.com/?id=247#j46

Do you eat at the same time every day?

I probably eat dinner more than other meals, but I most definitely do not eat at the same times every day...I tend to mix it up a fair bit.

thanks - that clears up my pet theory - I was thinking the ghrelin post I linked to could add to your explanation on glucose going down AFTER you feel hungry.   
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shovelqueen

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2010, 04:22:12 am »

Todd, that's great experimentation!!  Thanks for sharing so much information with us.  Just an observation, though.  You seem to use "insulin levels" to refer to the actually measured "glucose levels" in several places in your explanation.  Since you can't measure insulin levels, when you refer to them going up or down by 10-40 mg or whatever, I assume you are talking about glucose?  As this post is likely to be referred back to for a long time, might I suggest the following changes?


I've been experimenting over the past 3 weeks with using a blood glucose monitor to learn about what makes me tick, and a few friends and family members have also taken part in this study.  I know that several others on these pages (jbird, Heidi555 and phoebe) have shown an interest in this approach so I thought I would share a few things that I've learned, and some suggestions for others who might want to self-experiment.

First, some caveats: I am not a diabetic, not were any of my friends who tested this. So if you are diabetic, only some or none of this may apply. And I am not a doctor, so take any advice given here at your own risk, or check with your doctor before proceeding.

Insulin and glucose. A number of us on this site subscribe to the view that insulin levels are important in regulating weight and appetite. (See the Appetite Suppression vs. Setpoint Adjustment thread for more details). Ideally, we would like to be able to measure blood insulin directly but, alas, home blood insulin meters are not yet available.  I've had my basal insulin level measured during my annual physicals and it is very good.  I was at 10uU/ml a year ago, but after 6 months of low carb, intermittent fasting, appetite deconditioning and high intensity exercise and am now down to 4 uU/ml insulin.

The problem is that occasional basal insulin measurements don't tell you the hour-by-hour story of what is happening to your insulin.  And basal insulin also doesn't tell you whether or not you are insulin resistant -- which is the other half of the story, and probably what really is the driver behind high insulin levels and the risk of diabetes.

But inexpensive blood glucose meters are available and, with a little cleverness, we can use them to indirectly tell us what is going on with our insulin.

What to buy. Many makes and styles are available.  I was able to buy a Freestyle Lite at Walgreen's Pharmacy for $19. The Freestyle uses the smallest pinprick drop of blood, smaller than any other make.  That makes it almost painless, which is important if you are going to be taking 4 or 5 samples a day. The technology has improved so much, that you barely feel anything in taking the miniscule pinprick blood sample. 

The glucose test strips are expensive if you buy them in the drugstore (without a prescription), but from Amazon I was able to order a container of 50 test strips for $26. That's good enough for a week of experiments, enough for you to learn how your blood sugar responds to diet and exercise.  So if you are willing to invest $50-100 in this experiment, that's not too bad...or, you could just ask a diabetic friend to let you try a few test strips.

Preliminary results of experiments. I've learned a lot in the last few weeks, but I'll try to boil it down to the highlights:

1. Time. It really does take a long time for insulin(should read blood glucose) levels to return to baseline.  In my case, baseline is usually about 90-100 mg/dl, occasionally below 80, and occasionally above 110.  After a meal, it can take 2-4 hours to get back to baseline.
2. High carb. After a high carb meal, my glucose goes up quickly to about 140-150, then falls back to about 120 for 2-3 hours, and make take as much as 4 hours to get back to baseline.  This reflects the well-known 2-phase insulin response;  the cephalic or pre-prandial phase controls the blood sugar to no more than 140-150, then the postprandial, slowly phase, brings it back to baseline over several hours.
3. Insulin resistance. For some people (like my friend), blood glucose was slower to respond to the hi carb meal,  but kept increasing to above 190 mg/dL even 2 hours after the meal! And at the same time, my friend became hungry and tired when her blood glucose was that high. That is a clear indication of insulin resistance.  What is means is that the insulin receptors on the glucose transporters in the tissues are not responding to the high insulin levels...so glucose is not getting into the tissues, and she is actually "starving" even with all that glucose around.  Not a good sign.  And that is why many of the carboholics on this site paradoxically get hungry the more carbs they eat...the glucose and high insulin are shutting down the glucose transporters, make them ravenous.  If you think this sounds like you...do the experiment to confirm this.
4. Low carb. After a low carb meal, my glucose level barely goes up over baseline!  It's amazing...low carb really does control blood insulin.
5. Exercise. Immediately after exercise, like a one-hour run, my insulin(blood glucose) goes up between 10-40 units, very quickly! But then it comes down quickly, within an hour, to 10-20 units below the pre-exercise level.  So, net, exercise reduces my blood glucose.  The rise may seem paradoxical, but I think it means that adrenaline and glucagon are breaking down glycogen in the muscles to release glucose for energy.  That is good!
6. Sleep. After sleeping, in the morning, my glucose is typically 10-20 units lower than the night before.  If it was 110 at bedtime, it is 90 in the morning. And this is always associated with losing about 2-3 pounds weight overnight.
7. Coconut oil. Now here is one of the strangest things I found, though now it makes sense to me.  Coconut oil causes blood sugar to drop -- and fast!  Every time I've tested it, CO drops blood sugar by 10-20 units!  And I can even get my blood sugar to 70 or 80 (which might normally be a sign of "hypoglycemia") while feeling fully energized.  Furthermore, CO always increases my energy, but it actually creates a "wired" or adrenaline like feeling if I take it when my blood sugar at baseline.  So if I take it at 90, my blood glucose drops to 70 or 80, and  I get the adrenaline. This is because with the MCT fatty acids in your bloodstream, your liver acts to clear "unneeded" blood glucose, by shunting it back to glycogen stores.  (Otherwise you would have "too much" energy).  I have also read that CO transiently increases insulin levels (in order to lower glucose levels in compensation for the extra fatty acids in the bloodstream), although this is temporary because CO is known to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse symptoms of insulin resistance.  So here is one case where it is GOOD to raise insulin, temporarily.  If you raise insulin for short spurts when your blood glucose is low, you are increasing the sensitivity of your insulin receptors, helping to reverse insulin resistance!
8. Other fats and oils. Interestingly, heavy cream or other fats had NO effect on blood glucose. This corresponds well to my subjective experience that they are satiating, but not energizing.
9. Blood glucose and weight loss. I have found that I lose weight ONLY when my glucose is kept below 100 mg/dL.  Since it typically takes 4 hours after a big meal for the glucose to get down this low, this proves the importance of a fasting "window" after eating in order to lose weight.  Furthermore, I have found that if I go to bed after a big meal, with high glucose (120 or higher) then I lose NO weight in the morning.  This reinforces the importance of not eating big dinners or desserts late at night...cut off your eating by 7 or 8  p.m. and allow your blood glucose to come down before going to bed.
10. Hunger. I found very little correlation between "hunger" and blood glucose.  Actually, the one association I found was that hunger comes BEFORE a drop in blood glucose.  If I was every hungry, I would measure my blood glucose and it was the same...but 30 minutes later, it had dropped 10-20 units. So hunger causes a drop in blood sugar, but not the other way around This seems to confirm my hypothesis about pre-prandial insulin and hunger.  The thought of hunger...drives insulin up...which drives glucose down.  But this plays out in time, and the earlier event must be the cause of the later event. A dose of CO or platinum calories fixed the hunger...by driving glucose temporarily even LOWER, which then turned on glucagon and adrenaline to restore homeostasis.  Very interesting!
11. Fasting. During an experiment last week of not eating for 48 hours, my blood glucose remaining in a narrow window of 83-101 mg/L the entire time. During fasting, I had only water or herb tea. Once, I had a little low energy, took 2 tbsp of CO, and that boosted my energy (after dropping my glucose to 75 briefly).

I'm still learning a lot, but if anything, the blood glucose measuring experiments have convinced me that weight loss occurs only during times when blood sugar is kept low -- less than about 100 mg/dL.  And I did not necessarily get hungry when it was as lower than 100. The one time it was very low (80) and I was hungry, CO came to the rescue by freeing up more glucose from my glycogen. So hunger seems to have a life of its own, driven by psychology, and our physiology (insulin and weight loss) follow our psychology, not the other way around.  Most interesting.

Here's a thought: if you are constantly eating throughout the day and your blood sugar never drops below 100...or even 120 -- is it possible to lose weight?

So...There are a lot of questions to be asked, tested, and answered. I would be interested to have others post their experiences on this thread.

Good Luck!

Todd


 
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Seth Roberts

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2010, 05:40:02 am »

That's very interesting. I've tested my blood glucose many times -- not to lose weight but to see if it's okay. Your discovery about coconut oil is really remarkable. I've never heard that idea before -- and you have data not just an idea. To add to what you said:

1. I believe "fasting" (= early morning, before breakfast) blood glucose levels should be about 83. Mine was usually above that (in the 90s) until I discovered that if I take a one-hour walk (or similar exercise) the previous day it goes down to 83. In other words, we need something like a 1-hr walk every day to optimize blood sugar levels. I still haven't figured out if 2 30-min walks have the same effect as a 60-minute walk, but I tend to doubt it.

2. I don't think your blood sugar level below 100 causes weight loss. I think it's a correlate. Here's my explanation of your observations. High blood sugar implies constant eating implies too much hunger.
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NTB

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2010, 05:58:21 am »

You seem to use "insulin levels" to refer to the actually measured "glucose levels" in several places in your explanation. 

Good catch, SQ...thanks for catching my errors, which I corrected as you suggested! 

Todd
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NTB

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2010, 06:24:49 am »

That's very interesting. I've tested my blood glucose many times -- not to lose weight but to see if it's okay. Your discovery about coconut oil is really remarkable. I've never heard that idea before -- and you have data not just an idea. To add to what you said:

1. I believe "fasting" (= early morning, before breakfast) blood glucose levels should be about 83. Mine was usually above that (in the 90s) until I discovered that if I take a one-hour walk (or similar exercise) the previous day it goes down to 83. In other words, we need something like a 1-hr walk every day to optimize blood sugar levels. I still haven't figured out if 2 30-min walks have the same effect as a 60-minute walk, but I tend to doubt it.

2. I don't think your blood sugar level below 100 causes weight loss. I think it's a correlate. Here's my explanation of your observations. High blood sugar implies constant eating implies too much hunger.

Seth,

Yes, the glucose monitor is really an interesting tool, a real boon for self-experimentation. I wish we could also measure insulin, glucagon, epinephrine, leptin, ghrelin and other hormones to get a fuller picture.  Measuring just glucose is kind of like driving while looking through the rear view mirror --  you are just seeing the consequences of what you've done and not where you are heading. But even through indirect measurements, you can still learn about cause and effect.

The coconut oil effect is indeed remarkable. There is a lot reported on the energizing effect, but I've never seen the blood sugar lowering effect reported before either. If you take CO when your blood sugar is already low, you get a caffeine like edginess if you take too much, I think because your body is producing adrenaline in order to counteract further lowering of blood glucose.  Also interesting is that if you take CO during or after a high carb meal (like spaghetti, bread or pastries) it seems to moderate the spike in glucose and keep it from rising.  I've seen this twice now, so I'm not sure how reliable that effect is.  If it is true, perhaps it offers an inexpensive, convenient, and healthful way for pre-diabetics or insulin resistant people to keep their blood sugar in control? (Although I'm not sure this would work for Type I or advanced stage Type II diabetics who can't make insulin).  Although I would hope this is seen more as a means of "damage control" and not an excuse to give in to carbohydrate cravings.

Regarding exercise, my experience is the same as yours for extended aerobic exercise like walking. But for intense, short anaerobic exercise like weight lifting or sprinting, I notice that glucose first goes up sharply, then comes down.  My hypothesis is that the intense exercise causes a spike in adrenaline and/or glucagon, which depolymerizes some of your glycogen stores (in muscle or liver) to free up the extra glucose needed for intense activity. I would be interested to see whether others can corroborate these effects.

Also, I agree with you that keeping blood sugar under 100 is a correlate, not a cause of weight loss.  My explanation is similar to yours, but slightly different:  Keeping blood sugar over 100 implies eating too frequently to allow insulin levels to fall low enough to allow release of fatty acids from adipose tissues.  Fat burning is prevented when insulin is elevated. This is why I disagree with the common dietary advice to eat frequent, small meals throughout the day to keep hunger at bay:  Even though this will minimize fat accumulation by holding down insulin spikes, it will also prevent insulin from returning to baseline levels for long enough to turn on fat burning in a serious way.  I've found that it generally takes  2-3 hours for blood glucose to return to baseline (and presumably, therefore, also for insulin levels to come back down); so allowing at least 4-5 hours between meals (no snacks except perhaps SLD or platinum calories) is necessary if you want to lose weight. This window could perhaps be shortened, and the weight loss accelerated, if you were to exercise between meals, as long as you don't re-stoke your hunger.

Todd
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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2010, 11:38:33 am »

I asked about the ferulic acid because it's reported to increase insulin a touch.

If your coconut oil has ferulic acid that partially explains the blood sugar drop.

The coconut oil effect is indeed remarkable. There is a lot reported on the energizing effect, but I've never seen the blood sugar lowering effect reported before either. If you take CO when your blood sugar is already low, you get a caffeine like edginess if you take too much, I thin
Todd
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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2010, 12:53:19 pm »

I looked at bunch of blogs about 6 months ago from raw foodists and zero to very low carbers

The most famous one is Lex Rooker.   No other group seems to be posting careful observations.

They report quite regularly that the blood level starts at "baseline" in the 80s with lots of swings, and after a couple of months settles in at the high 90s, a significant move up a couple of hours after eating a meal but not a lot of movement either way.


That's very interesting. I've tested my blood glucose many times --
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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2010, 09:35:44 pm »

Here's a thought: if you are constantly eating throughout the day and your blood sugar never drops below 100...or even 120 -- is it possible to lose weight?
 

Depends on the amount you eat each time you eat, as well as cumulative calories for the day.

Constantly eating SMALL snacks throughout the day, with around 2 hours between snacks=Low carb

After a low carb meal, my glucose level barely goes up over baseline!  It's amazing...low carb really does control blood insulin.
 


Eg. of low carb snacks that are vegan that I use are: half banana, half apple, fistful of walnuts, fistful of almonds, half lunch twice, small desserts less than 100 cals each, small cucumber, 12-15 grapes, small cup vegan peanut yogurt, half dinner twice etc...each snack/meal is LOW CARB by virtue of size, and each snack/meal separated by 1/1.5/2 hours. Ofcourse, these are examples and I eat much more than this per day.
TOTAL CALORIES A DAY ARE KEPT SENSIBLE.

Why this should lead to weight loss:
1. small snacks become low carb, controlling insulin spike
2. ur next meal is always less than 1/1.5/2 hours away, so better control if hungry, and u dont feel like u are not eating.
3. most importantly, ur stomach gets accustomed to small meals and shrinks in size thereby sending lesser hunger signals and soon u will be satisfied with less food and have a flatter/smaller stomach that demands less food to feel full.

I have been eating like this for last 4 days and today I am showing a 1 kg decrease in weight. Weight loss with no deprivation!
I dont follow the rule strictly, if I am hungry, I eat my small portion and top it with some satiating nuts, and even break the rule by eating a dessert...but I break the rule once-twice a day and not more...which is enough because if u hv cheated on food twice a day u feel satisfed :)
 Also, when counting calories, I dont count the fruit/veg calories I eat. I feel really stuffed by evening after eating small meals/snacks in the day.

Eg. By evening I would have eaten about 900 cals and feel full, but I indulge myself and go ahead and eat around 300-400 cals more for the fun of eating delicious food...ofcourse, all cals are spread out over time.

Since I started, per day calorie consumption:
Day 1: 1400-1500 cals
Day 2: 1400-1500 cals
Day 3: 1320 cals
Day 4 yesterday:1270 cals....stuffed at around 1000 cals...still went ahead and munched 200-300 cals more for the fun of it.
Today morning: scale had been moving down last couple of day, today scale shows 1 kg less. :D

Edit:
Ofcourse, I make some of these snacks platinum (hmmm....maybe all snacks are nirvana, and some are definitely platinum) and maybe 1 SLD snack, to give an additional punch to the whole process.










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Jolly

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2010, 02:10:56 pm »

A blood glucose monitor is a powerful tool - I've been tracking my waking blood glucose levels for a while, and am starting to track pre/post meal levels too. 
One fun trick is you can use it to help determine if you are lactose intolerant or not!
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NTB

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Re: Blood glucose monitor as a weight loss tool
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2010, 07:11:50 pm »

Here is another interesting report by a guy, Lee Shurie, who "cured" his diabetes by limiting his eating to a single meal after 6 p.m. each day.  He measured his blood glucose several times a day, for many weeks.  He started with a high basal glucose level of 150 mg/dl.  He first tried the standard American Diabetes Association recommendations for a low glycemic diet, and exercise, but these helped only modestly. But the switch to intermittent fasting caused a huge decrease in blood glucose -- down to 100 mg/dL -- and ended up normalizing his blood sugars. He also "naturally" found himself eating much less and, as a side benefit, ended up with much improved energy levels:

http://shurie.com/lee/writing_defeat_diabetes.htm




Notice his comments about "un-training" his expectations about regular eating, the eventual disappearance of hunger, and the increased energy levels:

Quote
Upon waking in the morning I tested my sugar levels and found they were typically in the 150 mg/dl range. I expected them to come down by noon, but was surprised that they stayed above normal for quite some time. As the day went on I became worried (and hungry!), but I held off eating until nearly 6 PM, when my blood sugar level was normal. At this point I wanted to eat a huge meal, but I ate a normal dinner instead. As the evening progressed I snacked on healthy, low glycemic foods.

After following this regimen for days, which stretched into weeks, I discovered it provided whole new level of physical energy and mental alertness. After the first few days I was already "un-training" my body of the expectation that food would be provided at set meal intervals. After a week or so I no longer felt hungry until about 4 PM. On some days, I do not get hungry until 7 or 8 PM, but if I do get hungry earlier, I wait until 6 PM to eat.

...I had finally discovered a method that keeps my blood sugar levels at or close to the normal range. Diabetes was defeated! I naturally lost weight, and also began to experience many quality-of-life benefits which I did not expect, as well as marked improvement in measurements such as cholesterol and blood pressure.

A very inspiring story, indeed.
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