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Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage

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Tandoori Trilobite

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Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« on: October 27, 2006, 10:25:57 PM »


WEEKLY PROGRESS AND MILESTONES (updated Sunday mornings, Eastern Australian time)

Weekend 00 03/09/2006 -- 192 pounds (starting weight)
Weekend 01 10/09/2006 -- 190 pounds
Weekend 02 17/09/2006 -- 188 pounds
Weekend 03 24/09/2006 -- 186 pounds
Weekend 04 01/10/2006 -- 184 pounds
Weekend 05 08/10/2006 -- 183 pounds
MILESTONE: 181 pounds -- 13-stone barrier breached
Weekend 06 15/10/2006 -- 179 pounds
MILESTONE: 179 pounds -- No longer "officially" obese on BMI1
Weekend 07 22/10/2006 -- 178 pounds
Weekend 08 29/10/2006 -- 175 pounds
Weekend 09 05/11/2006 -- 172 pounds
Weekend 10 12/11/2006 -- (No consistent measurement available2)
Weekend 11 19/11/2006 -- (No consistent measurement available2)
Weekend 12 26/11/2006 -- 168 pounds
Weekend 13 03/12/2006 -- 167 pounds
MILESTONE: 167 pounds -- 12-stone barrier breached
Weekend 14 10/12/2006 -- 166 pounds
MILESTONE: 165 pounds -- "Over the hump" on my way down to my target weight
Weekend 15 17/12/2006 -- 164 pounds
Weekend 16 24/12/2006 -- 161 pounds
Weekend 17 31/12/2006 -- 158 pounds
Weekend 18 07/01/2007 -- 156 pounds
Weekend 19 14/01/2007 -- 154 pounds
MILESTONE: 153 pounds -- 11-stone barrier breached
Weekend 20 21/01/2007 -- 152 pounds
Weekend 21 28/01/2007 -- 149 pounds
MILESTONE: 149 pounds -- No longer "officially" overweight on BMI1
Weekend 22 04/02/2007 -- 147 pounds
Weekend 23 11/02/2007 -- 145 pounds
Weekend 24 18/02/2007 -- 143 pounds
Weekend 25 25/02/2007 -- 140 pounds
MILESTONE: 140 pounds -- TARGET WEIGHT ACHIEVED

1Yes, I know BMI underestimates body fat a little in average-activity people of my age, but it is a somewhat arbitrarily-defined line, after all.
2Away from home (and my own scales) on holiday (vacation), and mainly hoping not to lose too much ground with disturbance to routine and with social eating occasions with family and friends.



Hello folks!

I've been doing SLD and lurking here since early September, and thought I should probably in turn contribute to the documented experience on this site that I found useful when "window-shopping" SLD.

I'm a 53 yo man who stands 5'6" on a good day, and I'm aiming for my undergraduate weight of around 140 lbs.  Although I'm generally flabby, my clothes hide a multitude of carnal sins, and, when in my normal clothes, I don't think I look noticeably overweight -- apart from a disgustingly pregnant-looking belly that I can't suck in all of the way.  :(

I think SLD might be relatively unknown here in Australia.  I learnt of it by chance from a US-based bulletin board (thanks to you, Rabin! -- and I'm the poster often referred to as just "PF" over there :wink:).  For some strange reason, none of the three major Aussie bookstore chains even stocks Seth's book in this country.  Sure, they'll order the book in for you from the US on request -- but I decided that they deserved to be bypassed on this occasion, so I bought the book directly from Amazon, instead.  In any case, if people aren't going to encounter Seth's book on the shelves of a bookstore -- and if it's therefore not going to be advertised or promoted here, either -- then I guess SLD is likely to remain obscure in this country.  That's a shame, since we're the world's second-fattest country, and catching up to the US.

I've been taking a total of around 45-50 ml of ELOO a day over two doses.  The appetite suppression is working reasonably well for me, although I sometimes experience the dilemma of not having much real appetite, yet still having an acid or rumbling stomach.  However, I've been prepared to be aggressive and exercise a little willpower on top of the ELOO appetite suppression for improved average weekly results -- and I don't mind doing that when I'm positively reinforced frequently with seeing a result for it.

Anyway, my own progress so far is detailed below [now moved to the top of this post].  I check my weight on Saturday and Sunday mornings and record the lower result as my "weekend weight", in an attempt to factor out random one-day "bumps".  Weight loss hasn't been spectacular, but it's been steadily trending at 2 lbs per week, and, as long as I see a drop every weekend, I'm happy with that.

I also find that it helps to keep interest up by designating milestones to watch pass, eg:

181 lbs -- 13-stone barrier breached
179 lbs -- No longer "officially" obese on BMI
« Last Edit: August 06, 2011, 11:45:08 PM by Tandoori Trilobite »
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go2grl

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2006, 10:41:49 PM »

Hi Tandoori,

What awesome progress!  Looking forward to more posts! 

P.S. I tried to read this with a 'Stralian accent all the way through...failed miserably. The voice in my head stayed stubbornly American.  :wink:
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Tandoori Trilobite

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2006, 11:12:41 PM »

Thank you, go2grl!  I wouldn't worry too much about trying to imagine an authentic accent.  Suffice it to say that I don't sound as "broad" as Crocodile Dundee or Steve Irwin! :D
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anacara

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2006, 02:33:08 AM »


I think SLD might be relatively unknown here in Australia. 

For some strange reason, none of the three major Aussie bookstore chains even stocks Seth's book in this country.  Sure, they'll order the book in for you from the US on request -- but I decided that they deserved to be bypassed on this occasion, so I bought the book directly from Amazon, instead.  In any case, if people aren't going to encounter Seth's book on the shelves of a bookstore -- and if it's therefore not going to be advertised or promoted here, either -- then I guess SLD is likely to remain obscure in this country. 

Hi Tandoori Trilobite.  What city are you in?  In Sydney the book has been in all the major Australian bookstores (Dymocks, Angus and Robertson etc) and many of the independent bookstores, since at least July.  I first came acroos it in Gleebooks in Glebe, and I've even seen it in tiny suburban bookstores.  It would be good to get SLD into the Australian media though.
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Tandoori Trilobite

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2006, 03:54:59 AM »


Hi Tandoori Trilobite.  What city are you in?  In Sydney the book has been in all the major Australian bookstores (Dymocks, Angus and Robertson etc) and many of the independent bookstores, since at least July.  I first came acroos it in Gleebooks in Glebe, and I've even seen it in tiny suburban bookstores.  It would be good to get SLD into the Australian media though.

Hi, anacara.  I'm in Canberra (the reputed city of fat cats :)).  My local shopping mall has a Dymocks and a modest Angus & Robertson, and the book wasn't in either.  But -- more importantly -- I checked the online catalogues of the three majors (Dymocks, Angus & Robertson, and Collins).  In the case of Dymocks, I could not find any reference to the book at all, whether I searched by title, author, ISBN, whatever.  In the case of both Angus & Robertson and Collins, there was identical text saying that they could get the book in on request in fifteen days from the US (plus allow time for transport within Australia).  So, it appeared that none of the three majors was stocking the book in Australia -- so I took my business to Amazon (where I already have an account, anyway).

Coincidentally, I was at the same mall yesterday and, out of academic curiosity, checked the relevant shelves at Dymocks and Angus & Robertson again: no Shangri-La Diet to be seen.  And, just for fun, I've just checked those three online catalogues again.  In the case of Dymocks, nothing's changed.  In the case of both Angus & Robertson and Collins, things have since changed.  On both sites, it is now advised -- again, identically on both sites -- that the book is "On back order. We will place your order and advise when it is shipped." -- now implying, I guess, that they are stocking the book in Australia.  Well, at the time that I was looking for the book here, the online catalogues of all three majors suggested that they were not stocking the book in Australia -- too bad for them if their online catalogues are misleading and they lose sales as a result.

Borders might have it, but, as you're no doubt aware, there aren't many Borders stores in Australia.  There isn't one in Canberra, and the nearest one is about 300 km away in Campbelltown!  As it happens, I'm going "home" to Melbourne for a visit in just over a week, but, seeing I wanted to (and did) start on SLD in early September, I wasn't going to wait till November to start looking for the book in Melbourne.  And because of Canberra's peculiar town planning, most of the shopping here revolves around a handful of shopping malls, which means that it's mainly chain stores, and fewer independents than you get in "natural" cities.

I'm pleased, though, to hear that the book is being marketed in stores here by the major bookstore chains -- if they can just get their respective acts together and get it out to potential customers beyond Penrith, Berowra, and Campbelltown.  You see enough of them just walking around my local shopping mall! :wink:
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frenata

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2006, 04:05:27 AM »

The book is on the shelves in the US, obviously, but you can imagine the company it has. Diet books have their own sections in most bookstores here. We are a Large people (we weren't always, but don't get me started on that).

I have a theory that SLD will smolder for a while, but once enough of us lose enough weight and enough people ask us how we did it, it'll finally take off. Hopefully this will happen before Seth falls down and smacks his head on the pavement, like poor old Atkins did.

Anyhow, welcome TT!
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anacara

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2006, 04:26:25 AM »


Hi, anacara.  I'm in Canberra (the reputed city of fat cats :))

Hi again TT.  Hmmm Canberra - now, let me guess... could you possibly be a public servant? :wink:

Yes, I'd noticed that the book wasn't in online catalogues here when I was looking for an image of the Australian cover (apparently we have an export edition here - much prettier than the original edition).  I haven't checked Borders because I keep forgetting, but let me assure you, it is fairly well displayed in A&R and Dymocks.  When I found it in in Gleebooks, I wasn't in the nutrition/diet/cooking section, but there were a few copies on a stand in that area.  From a distance I noticed something about "No Hunger" and "Eat Anything", and I was hooked.

Re Australians being the world's 2nd fattest people: in Dec 2001 I made my first trip back to Australia after 8 years of living abroad, and I was astonished at how much fatter many people looked.  I remembered Australians (particularly the Anglo variety) as being tall and lean, if not downright bony sometimes, and came back to find teenage girls who could best be described as "chunky".  Now when I walk through Martin Place in the city in the mornings, I entertain myself by (mentally!) noting which people could benefit from a bit of Shangri-La!   
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Tandoori Trilobite

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2006, 05:07:38 AM »


Hi again TT.  Hmmm Canberra - now, let me guess... could you possibly be a public servant? :wink:
Well, yeah ... although sometimes I just describe myself as an IT worker who happens to be employed by the federal government. :)

Frenata, thanks for your welcome.  I think you're right in saying that the SLD method will smoulder for a while until there are more visibly obvious success stories walking around.  I've mentioned SLD to a couple of (fellow male) colleagues at work.  Neither of them had ever heard of it.  One has checked it out on the 'Net, but doesn't show any apparent interest in using it to reduce his pot belly (unless he's just trying it out discreetly in case it doesn't work for him).  The other colleague kind of accepts my explanation of SLD on an intellectual level, but seems to have a problem getting his head around the simplicity of the concept, and finds the idea of drinking some ELOO distasteful.  I've decided that I'm not going to "evangelise" further to them -- it's impolite to harp on at people about such matters, anyway -- and will just quietly persist until the (hopeful) final results become obvious.

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TwinkelToes

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2006, 06:36:36 AM »

Hi Tandoori Trilobite (fascinating  name by the way--but it makes me imagine you as a fossilized bit of food--oh, dear! :shock:   :wink:  )  I'm new here, too (although, like you, a lurker for some time)  and really appreciate your progress report.  Seems like the main thing is to lose the weight even if it is slowly and I like your idea of getting a "weekend" figure to judge your progress by. 

You have a BORDERS in Austrailia?  My gosh, that is amazing.  I'm from Ann Arbor (Michigan) and that is where the brothers started their very first store; on the edge of the U of Michigan campus.  it didnt take long for them to spread all over the US so I shouldnt be surprised that they are now Downunder.

But we live in the south now--in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains (not far from Atlanta, Georgia) and it seems like there are many people here in our small rural town who are very overweight; it is especially sad that a lot  of them are young children.  In fact, there  are whole families shaped like light bulbs.  I think SLD would be great for kids IF they could see the importance of getting the oil down and it could be fitted into their schedules..  I know that several members here use the sugar water approach, but it doesn't have the health benefits the oil provides, and the stats indicate that an increasing number of kids are developing worrisome lipid levels.  Our public health people need to see Seth's book and start spreading the word.
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falconcy

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2006, 07:09:56 AM »

G'Day TT I'm likely a typical Aussie, bit of a mongrel in fact, Aussie father, Pommie mother, grew up hating myself ;-) Spent my whole life in diaspora, currently living in Cyprus. Must get back to Oz one of these days. My dad was born in Leeton NSW, where loads of fruit used to be grown, though I hear these days, they tend to grow weed.

Welcome aboard.
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frenata

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2006, 07:19:01 AM »

I grew up in the South and go home to visit family every year. I had noticed the increasing hugeness of people over the years, too. Larger than people around Boston, where I live now. I assumed it was a Southern thing.

Then in August I had to go visit a factory in Vermont, right up on the Canadian border. Whoa! I couldn't believe the size of the people in that factory! These folks were on their feet all day long, running back and forth tending the machinery. And the largest specimens were quite young. Mostly women in their twenties.

I don't know if it's a rural or a blue collar thing, but it definitely clusters in the young. Even around here, the number of times I've seen what appears to be a mother and daughter together, where the mother is normal weight and the daughter is quite large.

I'm guessing the connection is prepared foods and fast foods. I get the definite impression kids don't cook for themselves. Perhaps the less well off tend not to cook for themselves either.

Seth would say the ditto effect. I would say it's that, plus a mystery ingredient (I'm obsessed with the idea that something in our manufactured foods -- high fructose corn syrup? hydrogenated hooha? I really don't know -- is messing with us).
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anacara

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2006, 07:34:18 AM »

... it definitely clusters in the young. Even around here, the number of times I've seen what appears to be a mother and daughter together, where the mother is normal weight and the daughter is quite large.

I'm guessing the connection is prepared foods and fast foods. I get the definite impression kids don't cook for themselves. Perhaps the less well off tend not to cook for themselves either.

Seth would say the ditto effect. I would say it's that, plus a mystery ingredient (I'm obsessed with the idea that something in our manufactured foods -- high fructose corn syrup? hydrogenated hooha? I really don't know -- is messing with us).

In Greece, especially at the beach where most things are on display, I've often noticed quite trim parents with heavy, podgy little children.  I figured that the trim parents grew up eating their mothers' wholesome Mediterranean cooking, and now that most mothers work, they are more reliant on packaged food to serve as fillers for their hungry off-spring.  Pre-packaged croissants made out of god knows what seem to be particularly popular there.
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TwinkelToes

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2006, 11:04:53 AM »

OK, gang, I KNEW I was seeing lots more heavy people here where I live than I saw on a recent trip to Maine and here are the stats for this below.  Someone here recently observed that the coming epidemic (maybe even a pandemic) of diabetes and insulin resistance is going to cost us ALL greatly and when you see these figures, you know that the flood is already upon us.  WE are the lucky ones--we have help at hand through SLD and the hope that by following it that we can still avoid some of the sorrows connected to obesity.  Please forgive the length of this and I hope I havent broken any rules in posting it.  If so, someone please let me know and I will gladly delete it.  TT, please forgive if I seem to have hi-jacked your thread, but this seemed to fit our discussion.


EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL TUESDAY AUGUST 23 AT 10 AM
REPORT FINDS OBESITY RATES RISE IN STATES, SOUTHEASTERN STATES ARE
HEAVIEST; NATIONAL POLICY PARALYSIS THREATENS TO MAKE PROBLEM
WORSE
Contacts: Laura Segal (202) 223-9870 x 278 or lsegal@tfah.org or Michael Earls (202) 223-
9870 x 273 or mearls@tfah.org
Washington, D.C., August 23, 2005 – Obesity rates continued to rise last year in every state but
one, and government policies and actions to date offer little hope of countering the trend,
according to a new report by Trust for America’s Health.

Mississippi ranked as the heaviest state, Colorado as the least heavy, and rates stayed the same in
Oregon, according to F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies are Failing in America, 2005.

Over 25
percent of adults in 10 states are obese, including in Mississippi, Alabama, West Virginia,
Louisiana, Tennessee, Texas, Michigan, Kentucky, Indiana, and South Carolina. Seven of those
10 states are in the Southeastern U.S.

“Obesity is a gateway to heart disease, diabetes and a host of other diseases,” said Parris N.
Glendening, former two-term Governor of Maryland, president of the Smart Growth Leadership
Institute, and co-author of the report. “There is much more that can be done to help people make
healthy choices about nutrition and exercise. For instance, decisions about where we build new
houses and highways or schools and sidewalks can mean the difference between giving people
more or less opportunity to participate in physical activity.”

Approximately 119 million Americans, or 64.5 percent, of adult Americans are either overweight
or obese. Estimates of the number of obese American adults rose from 23.7 percent in 2003 to
24.5 percent in 2004. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services set a national goal of
reducing obesity in adults to 15 percent or less of the population in states by the year 2010. In
addition, 16 percent of active duty U.S. military personnel are obese, and it is currently the
biggest reason for the discharge of soldiers.

“We have reached a state of policy paralysis in regards to obesity,” said Shelley A. Hearne,
DrPH, Executive Director of TFAH. “We need more and better data so we can make decisions to
get out of the debate limbo in which we are stuck. We have a crisis of poor nutrition and physical
inactivity in the U.S. and it’s time we dealt with it.”
Some other key findings from the study include:

• Federal obesity programs are too limited and silo-ed to have a significant impact toward
reducing or controlling obesity. Additionally, the lack of sufficient research to inform
policies and programs severely constrains activities.
• Obesity is exacerbated by the lack of significant policies addressing community design issues
-- such as sidewalks and suburban sprawl -- and greater affordability and accessibility of
healthy food options -- including the “urban grocery store gap.”
o People who receive food stamps are more likely to be obese compared to both
eligible non-participants and higher-income individuals.

• Most school meal programs still focus on delivering minimum versus maximum nutrition to
students, and physical education programs are given low priority.
o Six states have stricter requirements for the nutrition value of school lunches,
breakfasts, and snacks than the U.S. Department of Agriculture requires. Three states
have established new standards since last year.

o Eleven states have set nutritional standards for foods sold in schools that are not part
of the federally sponsored school lunch program, called “competitive foods,” which
include items sold in vending machines, a la carte in cafeterias, snack shops, and
bake sales. Nineteen states limit the availability of “competitive foods” beyond
federal requirements, such as restrictions on when they can be sold.
o Over one-third of states tried to improve school physical education programs in the
last year, however, requirements still fall short. While South Dakota is the only state
not to require physical education for students, most state requirements in place are
often not enforced.

• A majority of governors throughout the country have taken steps to initiate innovative
obesity-reduction and control programs for state employees, however, most statewide
initiatives aimed at the general public are often limited to public information campaigns.
• Forty percent of states have enacted legislation to limit obesity-related law suits.
• Trends suggest possible future changes to employer health care plans, such as “fit versus fat”
premium differences for individuals based on lifestyle and risk for disease due to obesity.
To help combat the obesity crisis, in the report, TFAH challenges the research community to
focus on five major research questions to better inform policy decisions, and policymakers to act
on 20 identifiable common sense based policy actions. Some of the key recommended policy
action items include:

• Bolstering Preventive Care: Employers, including the government, and Medicaid should
provide routine obesity-risk screening and more benefits for preventative care, obesity-related
disease management, and subsidizing and encouraging fitness activities.
• Leveraging Change in Food Options. The federal government should leverage its clout as a
major food purchaser to require a greater emphasis on nutritional value as a priority in the
bidding process for food contracts, such as in contracting for cafeterias, public-assistance
programs, and military meals. The government should also address public concerns over the
new food pyramid and the Women, Infant and Children and food stamp programs should be
adapted to focus on maximum nutrition for cost.

• Smarter Community Design: Communities and government must stress smarter
community design, including requiring the evaluation of the health impact of new building
efforts and updating existing development and encouraging design that promotes and
integrates space for physical activity, such as recreational space, sidewalks, public
transportation, and safe staircases, and the inclusion of food shopping venues in new
development.
• Improving School Nutrition and Physical Education: School districts should take the
position that minimum standards are not good enough for America’s students. Food contracts
should be reevaluated to focus on maximum nutrition as a priority in the bidding process.
And, physical education must be given greater priority in schools’ curriculum.
• Providing More Useful Information and Support: Federal, state, and local government
should provide more accessible, uniform, and constructive information to the public, extend
and fully fund community-based obesity-reduction efforts, and forge stronger partnerships
with private industry to support offering healthy options to consumers.
The chart below represents the rankings for percentages of obese adults in each state, from
highest to lowest. The rankings are based on averages of three years of data from 2002-2004.
Adult Obesity
Ranking (Highest
to Lowest)
State
1 Mississippi
2 Alabama
3 West Virginia
4 Louisiana
5 Tennessee
6 (tie) Michigan
6 (tie) Texas
6 (tie) Kentucky
9 Indiana
10 South Carolina
11 Arkansas
12 Georgia
13 Ohio
14 Oklahoma
15 Pennsylvania
16 (tie) North Carolina
16 (tie) Missouri
16 (tie) North Dakota
19 Alaska
20 (tie) Iowa
20 (tie) Nebraska
22 (tie) Kansas
22 (tie) Illinois
22 (tie) Virginia
25 Minnesota
26 South Dakota
27 Delaware
28 Wisconsin
29 (tie) Washington
29 (tie) Maryland
31 California
32 (tie) Maine
32 (tie) Nevada
34 New York
35 DC
36 Oregon
37 Idaho
38 Florida
39 New Mexico
40 (tie) New Jersey
40 (tie) Arizona
42 Wyoming
43 New Hampshire
44 Utah
45 (tie) Montana
45 (tie) Vermont
47 Connecticut
48 Rhode Island
49 Massachusetts
50 Colorado
(N/A) (Hawaii)
The report was supported by grants from the Dr. Robert C. Atkins Foundation, the Bauman
Foundation, and the Benjamin Spencer Fund. The report and state-specific information is
available on TFAH’s Web site at www.healthyamericans.org.
###
Trust for America’s Health is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to saving lives by
protecting the health of every community and working to make disease prevention a national
priority. www.healthyamericans.org
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Tandoori Trilobite

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage (update 5 Nov 2006)
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2006, 01:32:45 PM »

I've been on a roll for the last fortnight -- two successive weekly losses of three pounds.

In my sixth week on SLD -- after I'd only lost a pound between weekends 04 and 05, and was starting to get worred about possible plateauing -- I decided it might be a good idea to undertake some gently escalating exercise to keep my body "challenged" to keep the weight loss moving nicely along.  I had a pair of dumbbells with various weight-plates that I hadn't touched in years, so I set up a moderate daily quota of exercises with them whereby, during the course of each new day's quota, I would progressively perform more repetitions from the next weight increment up, and fewer repetitions at the current weight level.  If I felt like doing extra repetitions, I'd do them at the current weight level.  Well, I've certainly been doing more than the quota.  There's been an unrelated issue in my life lately that's been frustrating me, and I've found myself picking up the dumbbells at various times during the evenings and doing additional sets of repetitions to take my mind off things a little and work off some of the frustration.  Hey, I might as well turn a negative around and make it work for me! :) So, I've typically been doing around double my quota most days, and yesterday (Saturday) ended up doing over five times the quota!

I thnk the results (in my starting post in this thread) from weekend 05 up till now (weekend 09), compared with what was happening previously, might reflect the benefits of keeping my body a little "challenged" along the way.  I don't mind contributing some extra work when I can see a result for it, and my arms and shoulders are toning up with muscle, which can only help with the calorie-burning.

Taking this approach, I'm not using SLD as the be-all-and-end-all of weight loss, but as an adjunct to the old, commonsense formula that calories consumed must be less than calories expended for weight loss to occur.  The exercise is helping things on the "calories expended" side, while SLD is making it easier to manage the "calories consumed" side of the formula.  Here's hoping that they continue to work this nicely together.

It's amazing to lift a stack of my four 2-kg dumbbell weight-plates -- 8 kg is roughly 17 1/2 pounds -- and think that I've already lost more than that in blubber that I'm no longer carrying around everywhere.  Another thing: now, once again, I can sit in a chair and tie my shoelaces by just bending forward and tying while keeping my feet planted on the floor.  At my worst, I couldn't do that, because the belly blubber got in the way and prevented me from breathing while I was bent forward -- so I got into the habit of crossing my ankle over my knee to do up the shoe, and it's more awkward to do that way.
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bekel

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Re: Tandoori Trilobite's Pilgrimage (new post 5 Nov 2006)
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2006, 02:52:51 PM »

TT, I'm sorry I haven't made the time to read your thread before. I hadn't realized that Oz was getting heavy and the discussion here is facinating.

Safe travels!
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