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The Shangri-La Diet => Tips and Innovations => Topic started by: Heidi 555 on April 29, 2010, 07:55:22 AM

Title: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 29, 2010, 07:55:22 AM
I have come up with a new diet, which I am going to refer to as the Non-Addictive Food Diet for now.† Here is what Iíve learned so far from following this diet:

1. Addictive foods are much more fattening than non-addictive food.
2. The body responds to addictive food like itís a drug rather than a source of nourishment.
3. Which foods are addictive is unique to each individual.
4. One can do things to shift the level of addiction of a particular food.
5. Addiction can masquerade as intense hunger.
6. A diet that consists primarily of non-addictive food is healthy, nourishing, and satisfying.
7. Itís hard to overeat or gain weight when eating a diet of primarily non-addictive food.
8. The non-addictive food diet when combined with SLD is extraordinarily powerful.

I feel as though I have discovered the missing link that SLD did not address.† Weight loss has been the most effortless that itís ever been in my entire life.† Weight has fallen off easier and quicker than it did during my initial days of SLD.† I suspect that this diet may help others who are stuck at a plateau.† Even though I discovered this diet through the enlightened tasting, I donít think you need to do enlightened tasting to have it work.† However, I do recommend that you do this diet in combination with whatever you are doing for SLD.

The only tricky part is figuring what foods you are addicted to and to what degree.† For me this part is actually fun and enlightening.†

Everything that you eat and drink can be placed into one of three categories:
1. Food that you know is non-addictive, healthy, and nourishing for you
2. Food that you are unsure about or food that may be somewhere in between
3. Food that you know is very addictive for you

For me the beauty of this diet is that you donít have to eliminate all carbohydrate or all sugar Ė just the ones that are most addictive for you.† However, you do have to stay observant and aware in order to figure out for yourself, which foods fall into which category.† If you just start making changes to eat more of the food that you know is not addictive and avoid the food that is most addictive, then over time the rest will become clear.

For me most sugar and sweeteners are very addictive.† However, carrots, beets, molasses, and a lot of fresh fruit is not.† (I havenít had a chance to test out many kinds of fruit yet.)

For me lots of chips, crackers, and bread are very addictive, but different kinds are addictive to different degrees. Whole grain bread is much more addictive for me than white bread. (I donít really like most white bread.† It is still addictive for me, but not to the degree of hearty dense whole grain breads.)† I think that most whole grains if eaten plain are not addictive for me.† (However, I havenít had a chance to test a lot of them out yet.)† If eaten with butter they are more addictive.† If I sweeten them, then they become highly addictive.†

I recently went to a pancake breakfast.† I brought whole ground flaxseed with me.† I ate my pancake with butter and flax, but avoided the maple syrup.† This made the pancake far less addictive than it would have been with the maple syrup.† †

Vegetables even when doused in butter are not addictive for me.† Potatoes doused in butter are very addictive.† But potatoes mixed into soup are not.† Pasta mixed into soup is not addictive.† Eating very small amounts of pasta with lots of vegetables and sauce is okay for me, too.†

Extra sharp cheddar cheese is highly addictive for me, while blue cheese is not.† Melted cheese and cheese sauces are very addictive.† Plain ricotta cheese is fine, but sweetened ricotta cheese is not, even if I sweeten it with a non-caloric sweetener.† Cheesecake and cheese pastries are very big addictions for me.† I recently bought some goat cheese with cranberries and nuts thinking that it would be too strange to be addictive.† Well, I was wrong.† The goat cheese tasted sweet and was very addictive for me.† I suspect that most people would not be addicted to it though.†

Eggs even when cooked in butter are not addictive for me.† But eggs with melted cheese are addictive to a certain degree and so is egg salad.†

Plain cream and all things coconut are addictive for me.† Itís now blatantly obvious why platinum calories would not work for me.†

I rarely drink alcoholic beverages, but I now know why they can sabotage someone's AS (appetite suppression) and most peopleís diet efforts.† The body responds to them as a drug rather than a nutrient source.† I feel that the body responds to food that you are highly addicted to in the same fashion, even if those foods have some nutritional value.

I had no idea that I was addicted to this much food until I did this diet.† I am not overweight and SLD has kept my cravings and eating of addictive food to a bare minimum.† However, I did crave and eat dessert after every meal.† And I regularly ate whole grain bread and creamy things.† Mostly I channeled my cravings into healthier options such as unsweetened chocolate with raisins (thanks to VeganKitten† :) ).† It is only when I tried to give up all addictive food, that the full extent of my food addiction became apparent.† What an eye opener it has been.† Now when I eat food that I am addicted to, I feel a physiological response in my body.† I feel like a drug addict craving a fix.†

I have discovered that when I am tired I am most vulnerable to addictive food.† I crave sugar and carbs then.† A number of times I have come home thinking I was really hungry.† But when I tried to find something healthy and nourishing to eat, none of my non-addictive foods were appealing.† All I wanted was something sweet or starchy.† My body was not actually hungry!† I was astounded to realize that it was a false sense of hunger.† It sure did feel like real hunger to me.† Instead of eating, I did some enlightened tasting and the hunger went away.† I would like to get some L-glutamine to try at those times as well.

Eating non-addictive food has been very pleasurable.† I eat when Iím hungry and the food tastes good.† I eat until I am completely full, satisfied, and content.† I donít feel deprived.† I feel incredibly empowered from the knowledge and changes I am making.† This diet has been more enlightening and healing for me than SLD.† However, I wouldn't have been able to do this diet without combining it with SLD.† SLD has muted my cravings enough so that this kind of experimentation is possible.† When I nose clip an addicted food, it is still addictive but less so.† Nose clipping did not eliminate my addictions, it just muted them.† For me addiction is not completely rooted in the flavor of a food.† It is goes deeper than that.

I feel very motivated to completely heal my life long addiction to food.† I hope to fully decondition my bodyís reaction to addictive food.† Avoiding addictive food doesnít cure the addiction.† Itís too easy to channel the addiction into another food that seems healthier.† I feel like I have the tools to actually heal the addiction, but itís going to take more time and experimentation.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Pip on April 29, 2010, 10:57:51 AM
Wow. Very interesting. Food for thought, so to speak. Thanks for sharing.  :)

There are a couple of things that I find striking about your report. One is that you have made an effort to determine your body's response to many individual foods. I have also come to the conclusion that this needs to be done, but I came at it from the angle of food allergies, which I know I have and run in my family. Interestingly, foods that are allergenic often cause cravings for the very food that you are allergic to.

My experience has also been that food awareness combined with PC (or SLD as the case may be) is very powerful and pretty much makes the cravings go away.

There are links between sleep, serotonin levels and addictions, so it is not surprising to me that you have carb cravings when you are tired.

The second striking thing to me is that you hope to decondition your body's reaction to addictive foods. I will follow your progress if you choose to report back, here or on Todd's site (I'm assuming you plan to use some of Todd's techniques). Good luck!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on April 29, 2010, 12:22:08 PM
Lots of things to think about.† My first major diet, and quite successful, was the carb addict's diet.† The list of which carbs could be eaten at low carb meals matched up pretty well with my own.† Avoiding reactive carbs made dieting easy, but it was impractical to avoid carbs for a lifetime.†

Potatoes vs. in soup, pasta vs. mixed in vegetables, pancakes with syrup vs. with flaxseed -- that may all point to a glucose response to simple sugars, brought under control by a balance of protein, fat, fiber, and to a lesser extent, low glycemic carbs.† I'm working it from the perspective that glucose control is improved when protein/fat/fiber comes before carbs.† I'm experimenting with more protein, earlier in the day.†

Cream/cheesecake is a trigger for me, too, I think it's the mouth feel of butterfat coating the soft palate.† Coconut milk has a similar mouth feel as dairy.† The effect isn't shut down by noseclipping: alone or in smoothies, where coconut would be noticeable without noseclips, it didn't work noseclipped for me.† But 1 teaspoon coconut oil (or 2T coconut milk) in coffee, where it's coffee that's the main flavor,† gives me AS.†

I think it's more than taste, too.† When butter is cold, it feels like butterfat, but when it's warm, it hits a 'sour center' deep in my sinuses with the same intensity as buttermilk, apple cider vinegar, sourdough.† Maybe that's our attraction to fermentation, it hits that sinus spot.† Dark chocolate has a similar deep sinus sensation.† Whole wheat bread is irresistible about 4 minutes before it's done baking, same for brownies and microwaved popcorn (palm oil).† The intensity is heat-driven.† Maybe caffeine hits the same center.† Smell caffeinated beans vs. decaf - that deep sinus spot wakes up for caffeine.† Whatever is released by heating may be what makes us crave those flavors in their most dominant state, still warm, or roasted, or undiluted by other foods/flavors.

I'm taking a more cognitive path in dealing with cravings, making eating an overtly cognitive process, thinking through my psychological sticking points, and getting my mind out of beta waves.† Judith Beck gives me the framework for the cognitive management of cravings.† Martha Beck's visualization exercises give me the psychological perspective.† Gabriel's audio and other CDs shift me into alpha/theta states (as do Martha's exercises), and adding protein, omega 3, and something live/vibrant/colorful at every meal helps makes the stuff I don't crave pleasurable.

I make the distinction between craving pleasurable foods vs. nutritional cravings.† I can see craving what we're allergic to.† Our bodies recognize allergic symptoms before we do, and if we avoid those foods as long as we can, we're getting deficient in something.† We want them, we have them, our bodies don't like it, and the cycle of avoid/crave repeats.† I ran into an opinion that we crave all foods because of something missing in our diet, and if we can figure out what it is, we can substitute the craving with the missing nutrient. I can't remember where I read it to go find it again, but it would be interesting if somebody has a list of "crave X?† eat Y."

Without bread and bananas, I get less B12 and potassium.† When I cut back on corn, potatoes, rice, and bread, I also eat less butter.†† When I cut milk from my coffee, I no longer add cinnamon.† Increasing fat in my diet has improved hair, skin, mood, triglycerides.†Coconut may have increased my metabolism.†

Reading Gabriel and listening to his podcasts made me consider what's keeping my 'fat switch' on.† I think my problem is sleep deprivation.† I can't get the dog to go out earlier than 11 pm, but she wakes up at 4-5 am.† She's a sweet thing, but I am tired all the time.† I wonder if it's possible to keep her awake all day, so she sleeps more at night.† †:lol:

Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Pinkmug on April 29, 2010, 04:05:32 PM
Interesting! Requires several re-readings thou - not now that my brain is at 17.8%
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: VeganKitten on April 29, 2010, 05:06:50 PM
Oh, this makes a lot of sense, Heidi.

Know what?

Raisins + unsweetened dark chocolate has become an addictive food for me! Almost classically so.

Lots of foods would be addictive to me if I ate them, but I don't eat them (candy, pastries, chips, breads, butter and cream or cheese...). But many of the foods that I do eat are addictive to me, sometimes waxing and waning in addictive-ness.

Like I mentioned, I've had a problem with raisins lately; also pumpkin seeds and raw almonds. Raw cacao nibs. Coconut. Peanut butter. Earth balance margarine. Whole wheat pasta with margarine!! Tortillas and all bread (which I limit because I know I'll overeat them given the chance). Dried figs. OMG, under-baked or 'raw' bread dough is super-addictive to me.

Seems to be high-calorie items and sweets mostly -- the ones that I allow myself. And grains, especially any form of bread. And yes, it is a drug-craving feeling. I justify it, believing I can enjoy these things without guilt because they are healthy foods. I'm not eating a ton of calories, but I still gain a hard-to-shift pound or two (not overnight water weight) very easily when I KNOW I haven't consumed 3,500 excess calories.
 
It really resonates when you describe not being hungry for vegetables (for example), yet still being really 'hungry' for something comforting/addictive.

I don't think it's pathological in terms of a personal shortcoming -- I think it's just a fact of human appetite. But fascinating to try to better understand and work with.

I've been at a plateau and am now a couple pounds above even my ticker weight.  :x I really want to get to my goal and maintain. Yet I keep struggling with these few pounds up and down.


For TalkingRat: the importance of good sleep CANNOT be overestimated! Figure out some way to get enough, even if it's just to test it out for a few weeks to see what difference it makes. It's so important. I know it's tough though, I have a cat who is a little alarm clock. Darn beasties!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 29, 2010, 06:04:01 PM
I also posted this information on Toddís forum. If anyone wants to follow the thread over there hereís the link: http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,24.0.html

Pip, I had been very impressed with your discipline in discovering and eliminating problem foods.† I kept wondering what I should try to eliminate: wheat, dairy, sugar, refined carbs, all carbs, just grain.† It was really confusing to me.† Also, it was too hard to do.† I would try to cut something out and then rebound back to eating it.† The hunger was too intense.

Quote
The second striking thing to me is that you hope to decondition your body's reaction to addictive foods. I will follow your progress if you choose to report back, here or on Todd's site (I'm assuming you plan to use some of Todd's techniques). Good luck!
Maybe Iím being too ambitious, but it doesnít hurt to try.† Todd has great ideas and suggestions, but our processes seem to be leading us to try slightly different techniques.† My personality doesnít do well with rules and scheduling for example.† I need a lot of flow and a feeling of freedom for things to work.†

TalkingRat, youíve always impressed me with your attention to details.† The enlightened tasting has me very aware of the mouth feel and other qualities that you mention.† I wasnít aware of those things in that much detail before.† I think that level of awareness is useful.

Iíve appreciated your posts on the Gabriel Method and hope to download his CD or listen to some of his talks.† Is there anything that best summarizes all his ideas?†

Quote
I make the distinction between craving pleasurable foods vs. nutritional cravings.
Iíve been making a distinction between these too.† Iíve been thinking that cravings for healthy non-addictive food are clear communication of my body telling me what it needs.† Iíve been wondering if craving for addictive food is a breakdown in our bodyís communication system.† Our ancestors didnít have all this highly addictive food.† Now our supermarkets are loaded with it.

Good luck fixing the sleep deprivation.† I think good sleep is really important for lots of things.†

VeganKitten, I could really relate to all of your post, especially this:
Quote
And yes, it is a drug-craving feeling. I justify it, believing I can enjoy these things without guilt because they are healthy foods. I'm not eating a ton of calories, but I still gain a hard-to-shift pound or two (not overnight water weight) very easily when I KNOW I haven't consumed 3,500 excess calories.
†Thatís exactly what happened to me.† However, now I'm redefining healthy food for myself.†

I am hoping that food addiction doesnít have to be a part of the human appetite.† Even though most people have this problem, it doesnít seem like it has to be this way.† Also, Iíve had a lot of success healing relationship addiction issues, and those issues seem even harder to fix.† Having had significant addiction healing in that area, gives me hope that I can transform food addictions as well.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: August on April 30, 2010, 07:59:11 AM
I'm a bit concerned about viewing food through the addiction model.
Sure, we don't need the tasty treats we are tempted with now, but  10,000 years ago- in the wild- anything with sugar and/or fat in it would trigger a big fat EAT IT NOW message regardless of relative hunger levels.  From what I remember, we spent at least 1/3 of the time in a calorie deficit and had no refrigeration, so it just made sense from a biological perspective to eat until whatever it was was gone. 

It's only now, with calories so freely available everywhere that this behavior causes problems.  We've got to fool with blunting our appetite because we are not in the environment that appetite was attuned to, not because we are addicted. 

Your experiments yield good insights under both models; it's only that with an addiction viewpoint there is a sense of conflict between body and mind.  With an 'ancestral' viewpoint we can have cooperation and integration between body and mind.  Think of nose-clipping, for instance, as modifying the environment rather than tricking the body, for it doesn't make any sense that the body would want to be obese or infirm. 
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: VeganKitten on April 30, 2010, 09:35:22 AM
Modern foods have been engineered to exploit innate, ancient taste preferences. In other words, modern food (especially snack foods and sodas, stuff with high profit margin) has been designed to be as "addictive" as possible. I'm not sure if addiction is a sickness, or a not-unexpected physiological response to substances we were never meant to ingest (in cases like hard drugs or HFCS for example).

Or not meant to ingest in the quantities we have today... early man may have found honey (concentrated source of sugar), fermented fruit (alcohol) and psychoactive plants, but they weren't available in unlimited quantities and heavily advertised 24 hours a day.

Interesting perspectives to think about!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on May 01, 2010, 05:03:51 AM
Interesting point August, about thinking in terms of modifying the environment.† Maybe thinking that way will give me some new ideas.† The environment that I most need to alter is the social party/family one that has lots of decadent food temptations.† Fortunately that environment is not the norm for me.

Iím using the word addiction to refer to the physiological response that my body has to certain foods.† It is fascinating to me that certain foods trigger what I believe is a similar brain chemistry as drugs and other addictive substances.† I think that triggering that kind of physiological response with food makes the food much more fattening, or makes losing weight much more challenging.† I like beets with sour cream or Greek yogurt.† But they donít trigger that physiological response for me.† Yet sweetened ricotta cheese does (but not as much as cheesecake or cheese pastry).†

I donít view myself as having a sickness or disease.† In terms of addiction I am very fortunate.† I have never had an interest in alcohol, smoking, coffee, tea, etc.† I experimented with drugs (mostly in my younger days) and had powerful experiences that were spiritually meaningful to me.† Working with food addiction is really interesting.† Right now Iím much more emotionally attached to being and staying thin, than I am to any particular food item.†

So far the enlightened tasting experiments in conjunction with this diet have been successful in shifting my cravings for certain foods.† I think that the physiological response to addictive foods is conditioned.† Iím hopeful that I can reverse that conditioning.† So far so good.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on May 01, 2010, 04:37:04 PM
Heidi, I haven't seen any summaries of Gabriel's ideas.† But I'd suggest you start with the audio visualization.† The alpha/theta waves may be a large part of what makes his approach successful.† The brain waves help with sleep and stress reduction, as does the omega3 he recommends.† I got his book The Gabriel Method from the library.† The podcast called my attention to my sleep deprivation, but the podcasts were annoying.† Gabriel and the radio host continually interrupt with "uh huh" (Gabriel) or "wow" (host), and the disruption was compounded by the audio delay.† They also had no skill in cueing a caller when to start talking.†

Gabriel suggests people are fat because our body wants us to be fat.† Our body has turned on the 'fat switch'† in order to protect us.† The switch may be broken when it sends out the 'eat' message, but that's what we respond to, it's not that we want to do harm or sabotage ourselves.† When we diet, the body tries even harder to store fat, sensing famine and food restriction.† To shut off the switch, we need to find out why our body thinks we need protection.† Gabriel uses visualization with alpha/theta brainwaves to help people give the body messages that being thin is ok, and that they are safe.† In his book, he has a long list of stressors (sleep disruption, toxins, nutritional deficiency, allergies, indigestion, surgery, trauma, emotional stress) that keep the fat switch on, and when we know what's keeping the switch on, we can figure out how to shut it off.† The nutritional aspect for Gabriel seems to be eating organic and unprocessed, but he does it in small steps, starting with:† at every meal,† add protein, omega 3 (multiple sources) and something live/organic/green/vibrant.† Throughout the day, get adequate hydration -- modern foods have a lower water content, and we can't quench our thirst with food like we did long ago.

Thank you, VeganKitten and Heidi -- for the little push to get me to face my sleep problem.† I had a terrible plan, I was just going to wait until DS was home and we could take shifts with the dog.† :roll:† †I'm going to bed an hour earlier, and feeding her much later, so her after dinner trip outside is the bedtime trip, and I don't have to do battle to get her to go at bedtime.† She has arthritis, so I haven't kenneled her for years, but I need a way to confine her to the carpet.† I think she barks in the early morning because she moves onto the hardwood floor and after she's been there a few hours, she's stuck.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: fbnops on May 02, 2010, 11:16:56 AM
Quote
It really resonates when you describe not being hungry for vegetables (for example), yet still being really 'hungry' for something comforting/addictive.

That is well said, I know that feeling!

The most outstanding thing about my few months experience with the oil is losing that feeling.† At mealtime I am no longer craving pizza or fried chicken.† A vegetable (non-starchy) and a little bread or meat sounds just as good as a barbecue dinner.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on May 02, 2010, 01:00:15 PM
I have been thinking about the sinus sensation for my addictive foods, and wondered if I could make an attractive flavor less attractive by overpowering it with another flavor.† The last couple days, I've been eating cashews even when I wasn't hungry.† The calories add up quickly.† So today I experimented with reducing my attraction to roasted cashews by overpowering it with coffee.† I sucked on a single cashew.† I knew it would be salty, but I was surprised that when I didn't chew it right away, the salt overpowered the roasted cashew taste.† All I tasted was salt, and when the salt was gone, the cashew still didn't taste like a roasted cashew.† Next, I sipped coffee, cashew intact.† I chewed the cashew slowly, sipping more coffee every time it started to taste like a roasted cashew.† Cashews that taste like coffee are not appealing.† † :lol:† †I had two more cashews over the next 10 minutes.† I waited another ten minutes and smelled the cashew carton.† It smelled like yummy roasted cashews, but when I thought about how the 'new' flavor tasted, the attraction faded.† Not only did I not want another coffee flavored cashew, I felt full and not ready for lunch.† Haven't finished the coffee either -- maybe I killed two birds with one stone.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on May 03, 2010, 04:29:26 AM
TalkingRat, thanks so much for the summary of some of Gabrielís ideas.† I feel very much aligned with and mostly already do his dietary suggestions.† Also, itís a good idea to alleviate as many stressors as we can just for general wellbeing.† Iíll download his audio visualization when I get a chance.

Great post on the cashews and coffee combining!† Iíve wanted to do more things like that.† I was inspired by how you took your time with the experimentation.† I think that eating something slowly and really paying attention to the subtle nuances of taste is helpful for deconditioning flavors.† We tend to eat junk food really fast.† Doing the enlightened tasting has me much more aware of the myriad components that make a food pleasurable and addictive.†

My husband and I have continually had to come up with creative ideas to prevent our cat from waking us up in the morning.† Our most recent solution is a barrier in the hallway so that he canít access the bedroom door.† He loves to wail on the doorknob and make a huge racket.† Sometimes he manages to open the door.† Then we get this huge weight bounding on top of us, or a wet nose or paw batting us in the face.† I hope that you're able to find a successful solution with your dog.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on May 03, 2010, 08:58:07 AM
There's not much choice with how one eats a single cashew and makes it last.† :lol:† At the first tiny chip off the edge, a flood of flavor was released, so that made it important to go slowly -- to control the flavor.† †Wow, the AS afterward was amazing.† I left the carton on the counter for the rest of the day, that's how strong AS was.† When I had coffee later, I opened the lid and smelled cashews between sips of coffee.†The calorie-free method seemed quite effective, too -- the coffee cut out the sinus sensation of the cashew's smell almost immediately.† AS is still strong this morning.

I'm definitely making progress on the sleep problem.† The dog started fussing at 5:30 today, but I waited half an hour before going downstairs.† I need to train both of us to sleep longer.† The next step is to make the bedroom room totally dark, which Gabriel suggests for more restful sleep.†

I'd been having fishoil as SLD calories, but the last few days I've been taking 2 at each meal, as well as having flaxseed.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on May 14, 2010, 02:36:20 PM
TalkingRat, many thanks for pointing me to the Gabriel audio visualization.† Iíve listened to many hypnosis or visualization recordings and his is especially good.† Iíve been enjoying it in terms of relaxation and help with sleeping.† I donít really need it for weight loss as Iím back to my goal weight, but it is very affirming.† Iíve been trying to find some other relaxation recordings that I like.† Iíd also like to find the time to make my own.† I use to do that.† Making your own tapes that are specifically tailored to your personal issues is very empowering.† It might be good to start a thread on the Gabriel Method as many people here have been inspired by it.†

My non-addictive diet explorations have continued to go well.† So far the best benefit has been the enormously enhanced self-awareness around food addiction.† Itís been fascinating to observe exactly when and how my food addictions arise.†

My addiction tends to break down into two components: a craving for something sweet or a craving for something starchy and filling.† Mild cravings are easy to deal with, but strong cravings are more of a challenge.† Strong cravings for starchy carbs do not go away if I ignore them, and manifest as intense hunger.† The enlightened tasting does relieve them.† I havenít had any really strong cravings this past week or so.† Iím hopeful that that level of withdrawal type symptoms is starting to subside.†

Even though Iíve done a lot of deconditioning around the flavors of many foods, the physiological addiction can be so strong that I still want the food for its sweetness and texture, even though the treat doesnít taste as good as it use to.

Iíve been a bit looser with this diet than when I first started it.† But my level of awareness and consciousness around what Iím doing and why remains high.† When I eat a piece of bread or a dessert, I observe and remain mindful of the entire addictive context.† I think that this level of observation and awareness is immensely healing.† Iím no longer at the mercy of unconscious and uncontrollable urges.† Thereís a feeling like Iím gently unraveling something that is deeply rooted in childhood and infancy.† Iím aware of the connections.

Seth wrote a great blog post on a woman using a two pronged approach to quit smoking. http://www.blog.sethroberts.net/2010/05/01/new-way-to-quit-smoking/  (http://www.blog.sethroberts.net/2010/05/01/new-way-to-quit-smoking/)† This womanís approach to quitting smoking is identical to what Iím doing with food.† It was very affirming that this two prong method could be applied to other addictions.† The two things together are much more powerful than either one by itself.† I thought that it could also be applied to addictions such as drinking and coffee.† For example, someone could drink a non-alcoholic beer like beverage and nose clip the actual beer, or drink decaffeinated coffee and take a separate caffeine pill.

Someone could also do the non-addictive diet with a different combination of techniques than what Iím using.† For example, taking oil could be substituted for the nose clipping and Toddís deconditioning diet could be substituted for the enlightened tasting.† But I think that a two prong approach is more powerful and thus more helpful for people with strong physiological addictions.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on May 20, 2010, 04:25:18 PM
Things are progressing well in terms of deprogramming my cravings.† I started doing enlightened tasting with food that I was addicted to in childhood.† Iíve been using foods that are too sweet or too junky for me to want to eat, like chocolate cake (or brownies) with chocolate frosting or barbecue potato chips.† It brings back pleasant childhood memories when I do the enlightened tasting with them.†

Iíve noticed that with enlightened tasting the flavor can become more neutral, but then Iíll still crave the food for its other properties like its taste or texture.† Eventually the food stops seeming appealing.† With some foods I continue to do enlightened tasting once the food has lost its appeal, because I think Iíd prefer to push the food into slight repulsion.† Although maybe I could stop when the food reaches neutrality and still be okay.

Today I had a significant breakthrough.† Iíd been hoping that once I deconditioned enough foods that I would no longer desire addictive foods in general.† After I ate lunch today, not only did I not crave any dessert, but I found that the idea of eating something sweet was slightly repulsive.† It felt like a small victory.† My cravings tend to be worse in the evening after dinner or at times when Iím really tired, so I know that I'll still have to deal with cravings then.† But Iím hoping that given more time I can eliminate them entirely.† Iíve noticed that Iím much less tempted to eat addictive food at other times.† This is new for me.† Before if temptation was in front of me, then I would partake.

The woman who contacted Seth about using a two pronged approach to quit smoking (see: http://www.blog.sethroberts.net/2010/05/01/new-way-to-quit-smoking/) has been PM-ing me.† She is incredibly clued in to the conditioned mechanism of addiction, and has pointed me to some other approaches to addiction that are accomplishing the same thing as what I am trying to do.† She has been helping me out a lot with her ideas and understanding.† I hope that she will be inspired to post more, either here or on Toddís forum.

She pointed me to the Sinclair Method of using naltrexone to heal alcohol addiction.† Naltrexone is also used in low doses for autoimmune diseases.† For awhile now Iíve been feeling like my autoimmune diseases are very connected to my food cravings/addiction.† I am excited by the idea that I might be able to heal some chronic conditions that I didnít realize were being caused or aggravated by food addiction.

I have been reading up on the Sinclair Method.† I feel like it is very similar to what I am doing with food, except that I am using enlightened tasting instead of naltrexone.† The method promises a complete cure for alcohol addiction, except that a person always needs to take naltrexone before drinking.† I hope to be able extinguish my food addiction to the point where I no longer need the tool of enlightened tasting.† I also hope to get to the place where I can eat moderate amounts of bread and desserts without reinforcing addiction.†

Here is the forum for the method: http://www.thesinclairmethod.com/community/index.php

I highly recommend reading the FAQs:
http://www.thesinclairmethod.com/community/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=19

If I replace food addiction for alcoholism and enlightened tasting for naltrexone, then most of what is written holds true for me.† They say that it takes a minimum of 3 months to extinguish the addictive pathways.† For some it takes 7 months or longer.† †
 
Here is a quote from the FAQs that I liked:
Quote
Addictive drinking has little in reality to do with the concept of ďpleasure.Ē Addictive drinking has everything to do with reflexive action. It happens at a non-conscious, automatic level. It takes time and many instances of drinking to strengthen addictive circuitry in the brain. Each time the person who is genetically at risk drinks, there is reinforcement to the opioid system via endorphin release. Eventually there is a broadening of existing opioid pathways into great drinking super-highways. In reality, we find that most people who truly suffer from alcoholism do not claim that they enjoy drinking. They get little pleasure out of it, much like heroin addicts do not gain much pleasure once they have become addicted. Certainly not enough pleasure to balance all the suffering caused by the alcohol or opiates. Alcohol abuse is not rational. That is also why it is a problem and why we should not confuse the terms ďpleasureĒ and ďreinforcement.Ē

On a not as good note, I have been a lot more tired than usual.† It might be due to allergies or it might be withdrawal symptoms.† I no longer give myself the quick sugar or carb fix for energy.† Also, I had a flare of some old health symptoms yesterday, which seemed to coincide with my breakthrough today.†

I think that the deeper emotions underlying my food addiction have to do with fear, scarcity, and not feeling nourished by life.† I am composing some affirmations to address these issues and hopefully reprogram the emotional level as well.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on May 20, 2010, 05:06:39 PM
Heidi, glad the Gabriel audio is useful.  I am starting to read about visualization and affirmations, so I may get to the point of making my own audio.  I'm hoping DS can help me when he gets home, he probably knows how to add voice to music, and then I can add visualization on top of theta or alpha/theta waves. 

I haven't been inspired to start a Gabriel thread yet.  It's a low energy week, I didn't even post on my progress page.  It was Anacara who called my attention to Jon Gabriel's book and audio. 

Since my coffee experiments, I have had an interest in cashews only once, on a day I had not eaten my minimum protein and it was about two hours after dinner time, which I'd skipped.  If I had made some decaf, I have no doubt that would have stopped the craving, but I figured it was cashews or dinner, so I got lazy and didn't make it an experiment.   :lol:
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: NTB on May 21, 2010, 07:10:27 AM
I have been reading up on the Sinclair Method.† I feel like it is very similar to what I am doing with food, except that I am using enlightened tasting instead of naltrexone.† The method promises a complete cure for alcohol addiction, except that a person always needs to take naltrexone before drinking.† I hope to be able extinguish my food addiction to the point where I no longer need the tool of enlightened tasting.† I also hope to get to the place where I can eat moderate amounts of bread and desserts without reinforcing addiction.†

If I replace food addiction for alcoholism and enlightened tasting for naltrexone, then most of what is written holds true for me.† They say that it takes a minimum of 3 months to extinguish the addictive pathways.† For some it takes 7 months or longer.† †

Great post, Heidi!† I'm really intrigued by the Sinclair Method.† I spent some time yesterday reading through the site you linked to and it is fascinating. The naltrexone works as an opiate antagonist, so it blocks the pleasure pathways. So if you drink alcohol (or engage in any addictive activity) while taking the naltrexone, you are providing the stimulus without the reinforcement, and eventually the addiction is extinguished. This is classical extinction theory, but it is so clever because it allows the entire stimulatory behavior to occur -- right up to the final reinforcement in the brain, but the reinforcement is blocked.† In this way, it resembles your Enlightened Tasting and Non-Addictive Food Diet approach, which allows† the entire stimulatory behavior (the smell, taste, texture and even chewing behavior of food) to proceed as completely and normally as possible, but withdraws† the last step -- reinforcement by blood glucose and fat, and their hormonal and neurochemical responses in the brain.† †As Conklin and Tiffany (http://gettingstronger.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Conklin-2002-Cue-Exposure-and-Addiction.pdf) observed in their study of cue exposure therapies, the more realistically you can stimulate the cues and actual behaviors, while blocking the actual reinforcement, the more effective is the extinction.† Your method and the Sinclair Method take this to the extreme -- allowing the entire behavior right up to the end point.

There's even another analogy between naltrexone and Enlightened Tasting, that is predicted by Solomon's opponent-process theory (http://gettingstronger.org/2010/05/opponent-process-theory/) that I've been writing about on my blog. By preventing activation or binding of the opioids or endorphins in the brain, the brain actually compensates by more gradually ramping up the level of opioids in order to increase the overall level of pleasure.† Not immediately, but over time. In fact, this is apparently the mechanism of how low dose naltrexone works in autoimmune diseases like MS.† Apparently, in MS† and other autoimmune diseases, their is a deficiency of endorphins, which leads to spasticity.† The naltrexone first blocks the opioid receptors in the brain, around plaques.† But the brain responds by upping the general level of endorphins, which counteracts muscle spasticity.† This is all addressed at this website: http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/ldn_and_ms.htm

It is absolutely fascinating to me to see the common mechanisms in these different approaches to extinguishing addiction and modulating the balance of pleasure and pain to forge new neural pathways and change our behavior by changing our brain. I've continued this discussion on your thread over at the GS forum (http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,24.msg224.html#msg224)

Todd
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 02, 2010, 06:02:53 PM
TalkingRat, the info that you've been posting on the brain and audio waves has been really interesting.† I researched all of that a long time ago, but have forgotten most of it.† Let me know if you make your own tape or come across any other good free downloads.

Todd and I have been continuing this discussion on his forum: http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,24.0.html

Here's my lastest update that I just posted over there:

Iíve come to prefer Enlightened Tasting more than actually eating desserts and junk food.† (I still much prefer to consume healthy, nourishing food Ė those foods leave me feeling good.)† Every once in awhile I still want to eat a piece of bread.† But most of the time the Enlightened Tasting alleviates my cravings and leaves me feeling satisfied.† After I do it I still feel good.† If I ate that kind of junk food, it would leave me feeling crappy.† †When I thoroughly indulge in Enlightened Tasting, I end up reaching a state of over saturation.† The food and process ends up seeming gross and disgusting.† But those feelings pass in a matter of minutes.† Had I actually eaten all that crap, I would feel stuffed and gross for hours.†

Iíve come to feel that the food that Iím addicted to isnít real food.† Itís food manufactured solely for addiction.† I use to think that it was okay to indulge in dessert and treats.† But doing this process has me acutely aware of the subtleties that go into creating addictive food substances.† Even the packaging is filled with lies and deception.† Originally my goal was to be able to eat desserts without being addicted.† But perhaps Iíll stop desiring those kinds of foods completely.† Iíll have to see where this process leads me.† I know Iím moving in the right direction.† It will be interesting to see where I end up.†

Iím not sure yet, if the Enlightened Tasting will function as a replacement addiction and Iíll then have to wean myself from it.† It is obviously but gradually working.† I can tell that Iím much less addicted than I use to be.† Iíve lost my desire for lots of kinds of junk food.† Itís an incredible relief to not be as addicted as I use to be.† I look forward to no longer having any food addiction.† This method has been incredibly easy for me.† If need be I could sustain it for a long time.† But Iím hopeful that after awhile I can let go of it as a tool.†

Iíve had this food addiction for a really long time.† The foods that are the hardest to decondition are the ones that were deeply reinforced in childhood.† At this point I have no problem being patient because I can feel how well itís working.† In the beginning I felt like I was taking a big risk, but the Sinclair Method, Toddís posts, and my success so far have been really reassuring.†

Iím no longer focused on losing weight.† I make sure that Iím eating enough good healthy food.† Originally I had thought that I wanted to go a few pounds lower than my goal weight.† †But now that Iím here, Iím more concerned with maintenance than losing more.† Itís nice to have my focus solely on eliminating my addiction.† †Itís easier being singly focused.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on June 02, 2010, 08:42:36 PM
Heidi, Glad you are continuing to make progress with your Enlightened Tasting.  My short experiment with cashews and coffee is still working for cashews.  I have no interest yet.  But I got some pistachios for DS, so I need to try pistachios and coffee. 

Interesting thing about bread, after being away from flour for a few months, I have been able to add it back to my diet a couple times a week without the 3 lb overnight weight gain.   I have had similar success reintroducing  rice and milk.   

Haven't got around to exploring the idea of making my own affirmations tape, but I have some library books on visualization and mindful eating, so I am getting more ideas.  Perhaps too many ideas and not enough implementation. 



Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: NTB on June 03, 2010, 02:01:19 PM
Heidi,† It's great to hear that ET is working so well.† I'm also glad to hear that this has allowed you to focus on eating healthy foods, as opposed to weight loss.† Yay!

I found that your ET approach helped me in cutting back on the frequency of drinking alcohol, for which I had acquired a certain taste.† (The approach was remarkably similar to what professional wine tasters do...I'll bet that this iimmunizes them to some extent against becoming alcoholics! It would be nice to know if there is any research on that).

It's interesting to hear that you and Talking Rat are able to eat (or re-introduce) foods that used to be addictive and still enjoy them.† I think that once the deconditioning effect kicks in, the secret to avoiding relapse is to be diligent about limiting the frequency and amount of consumption of the previously addictive foods.† Now that I'm drinking no more than 2 drinks a week, I have extinguished any cravings.† Sometimes I think to myself it would be nice to drink on a third day, but I let the thought pass for now.† I want to be sure I have a stable pattern that is reinforced.† This is predicted by Richard Solomon's opponent process theory (http://gettingstronger.org/2010/05/opponent-process-theory/) He found that addictive behaviors can only get started if the intensity, and frequency of the pleasurable stimulus exceed a certain threshold, beyond which cravings are induced.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 05, 2010, 05:03:39 PM
TalkingRat, thatís great that youíve had success reintroducing problem foods and with your coffee/cashew experiment.

Quote
It's interesting to hear that you and Talking Rat are able to eat (or re-introduce) foods that used to be addictive and still enjoy them.
Todd, I donít feel like Iíve eliminated my addiction with any foods yet.† Perhaps my standards are set too high because I truly want to be free of food addiction.† So far I feel as though Iíve turned down the volume of my addiction.† It is not as loud and blaring as it use to be.† Iím not as much at the mercy of it and am making better choices.†

I spent a lifetime trying to channel my addiction into good substitutions, but doing that suppressed and strengthened the addictive urges.† My addiction was like a wild beast underneath that I wasnít fully conscious of, and yet it was ruling my life.† Eating a non-addictive diet combined with enlightened tasting is the first thing that Iíve done that seems to have genuinely lessened my addiction.†

Originally I had hoped that nose-clipping would heal my addiction, but even though I wasnít tasting food I still had addictive cravings.† Nose clipping helped me to quiet my addictions and make healthier substitutions, but it didnít address the core of the addiction.† I hope that the enlightened tasting will lead to a permanent change.† Iíll explain more in my response to your questions at your forum. http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,24.msg247.html#msg247

Quote
Now that I'm drinking no more than 2 drinks a week, I have extinguished any cravings. Sometimes I think to myself it would be nice to drink on a third day, but I let the thought pass for now. I want to be sure I have a stable pattern that is reinforced.
Forgive me for mentioning things that you already know, but I keep thinking that you might want to approach your drinking like you did your diet changes.† You could very gradually mess with the variables so that you come to a place of complete freedom with it.† Maybe before upping to a third drink, you might want to try for 1 drink and then none.† Even though you donít want to give up drinking completely, in order to be free of any compulsion you have to be able to easily move it in any direction.† When reinforcing a stable pattern you can end up in a narrow range.† Gradually and unpredictably changing the timing, days, and number of drinks will increase your range.† Iím curious to hear your thoughts on this.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on June 06, 2010, 05:57:57 PM

Here's a freebie -- the EFT Tapping World Summit.  With some freebie bonus MP3 interviews.   Besides the bonuses, the daily stuff is only available for free for the 24 hours after it airs.

http://products.mercola.com/tapping-world-summit/
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: NTB on June 07, 2010, 02:39:21 PM
Todd, I donít feel like Iíve eliminated my addiction with any foods yet.† Perhaps my standards are set too high because I truly want to be free of food addiction.† So far I feel as though Iíve turned down the volume of my addiction.† It is not as loud and blaring as it use to be.† Iím not as much at the mercy of it and am making better choices...My addiction was like a wild beast underneath that I wasnít fully conscious of, and yet it was ruling my life.

Those are great, vivid metaphors:† turning down the volume, taming the wild beast.† I think the metaphors capture the fact that addictions are a continuum -- not a black or white thing -- that need to be tamed progressively & gradually brought under control.

Quote
Forgive me for mentioning things that you already know, but I keep thinking that you might want to approach your drinking like you did your diet changes.† You could very gradually mess with the variables so that you come to a place of complete freedom with it.† Maybe before upping to a third drink, you might want to try for 1 drink and then none.† Even though you donít want to give up drinking completely, in order to be free of any compulsion you have to be able to easily move it in any direction.† When reinforcing a stable pattern you can end up in a narrow range.† Gradually and unpredictably changing the timing, days, and number of drinks will increase your range.† Iím curious to hear your thoughts on this.

This is an excellent suggestion, Heidi.† I should have thought of it myself!† But you are right that varying the pattern is useful in preventing the establishment of a new pattern.† To some extent, I'm already doing that, since I drink two days a week, but typically on different days, with different types of drink (sometimes beer, sometimes a cocktail), so the pattern is not too regular.† But I will try being even more unpredictable, and vary the number of days per week down and up.† Of course, I'm going out to celebrate my birthday tonight with family and relatives, and I will definitely have a drink with dinner, so I will wait until tomorrow to start this!!

Thanks
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: shovelqueen on June 07, 2010, 02:59:20 PM
Happy Birthday, Todd!! :D
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Pinkmug on June 07, 2010, 03:02:36 PM
it is Todd's BD??? Well Happy Birthday, Todd!...  8)
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: NTB on June 07, 2010, 03:56:42 PM
Thanks, SQ and Pinkmug.  Getting older is OK, especially considering the alternative!

By the way, nice new photo, Pinkmug!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: nougat on June 07, 2010, 08:58:09 PM
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Todd!!!


Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 11, 2010, 12:31:20 PM
TalkingRat, thanks for the link.

A belated happy birthday to you, Todd.† I hope that you had a nice celebration.† Iím glad that my suggestion was helpful to you.† Youíve offered me, as well as other people, so many helpful suggestions.† It was nice to offer you something in return.† Hereís the update that I just posted on your forum:

Thanks Todd for mentioning about the potential for an underlying nutritional deficiency.† I havenít supplemented with chromium, but Iíve tried all the other supplements that youíve mentioned.† It would be wonderful to discover some simple and easily remedied underlying nutritional cause.

Also thanks for explaining what Iím doing from a Pavlovian point of view.† I guess Iíll have to wait and find out over time if the enlightened tasting becomes addictive in and of itself.† Also, Iíll have to wait and see if it actually leads to extinction and a permanent shift in circuitry.† It definitely is a long slow process.† There are so many things that I havenít deconditioned.† I had been hoping that my body would generalize more.† But mostly itís been item by individual item.†

It seems like with chips and crackers that Iím getting to a place where Iím no longer desiring them in general.† Yesterday I went to the store that has the free chip samples.† It was before dinner and I was really hungry.† There was one new kind of chip.† I hesitated before trying it, which was a good sign.† There was a feeling like I really didnít want any chips.† I was glad for that feeling.† I tasted the new kind of chip.† It was good in some ways and not so good in other ways.† I was relieved that I didnít have an addicted response.† I was able to walk away after eating just one chip.† It was another small but hopefully significant success.

Today I ate out for work.† They had warm homemade bread.† I debated whether or not to eat it.† I did end up eating it and it tasted okay, but not amazing.† I had no desire for another piece.† I was amazed and relieved.† This diet is really working!† Warm, freshly baked bread with butter has always been a HUGE addiction for me.† I canít believe that it just tasted okay, but not fantastic.† My mind canít believe that my taste for bread has actually changed that much.† Itís strange having something that youíve always been crazy about, no longer be that appealing.† Weird but wonderfully so.† Iím grateful for the success.

Sweet baked goods are taking longer to decondition than starchy carbs.† I keep buying new dessert items.† Having something new to decondition usually ramps up the cravings.† It typically takes about 3 enlightened tasting sessions for the heightened craving for that particular item to settle down.† Then it can take many more sessions for the food to lose its appeal.† There are a few items that are taking a very long time to decondition.† With those items the texture and combinations of sugar, fat, and salt are especially seductive.† The addiction remains hooked into those elements even after the flavor has lost its appeal.

I read a little more on the Sinclair Method web site.† They said that it takes a minimum of 3-4 months for extinction to occur.† If someone has success before then, then it is not due to extinction.† For most people itís more like 6-7 months.† Iíve been thinking a lot about habits and long term changes that Iíve made in my life.† Iíd say that it takes 3-4 months to really establish a new pattern.† And then it seems to take 6-7 months before that new habit becomes really deeply ingrained.† Then maybe it takes a year or more before it becomes so natural that I no longer think about it.† After a year or so it becomes really hard to remember the old pattern and how things use to be.†

Also, I read a thread on the web site discussing whether it was best to just keep drinking and taking the naltrexone as much as desired, or whether it was good to make a conscious effort to cut back on oneís drinking.† The responses were in alignment to what Iíd been feeling with the enlightened tasting.† People suggested waiting 3 months or so until cravings had somewhat subsided, before making more of conscious effort to shift oneís habit.† Once the cravings have subsided it doesnít take much in way of willpower. (Willpower typically doesnít work so well.) When cravings arenít so strong, then thereís a feeling of having a choice.†

I have been purposefully allowing myself to do enlightened tasting as much as I want.† Mostly I do it once and sometimes twice a day.† Sometimes itís very brief, just a few tastes of one item.† Often itís longer and I do a series of items.† I usually try to wait an hour after eating before doing enlightened tasting.† Once I feel like my cravings have really subsided, then Iíll work on cutting back on the enlightened tasting.† Iím hoping that my desire to do enlightened tasting will just naturally wane over time.† Weíll see how it goes.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on June 12, 2010, 07:11:54 PM
There was an addictive behavior EFT session tonight, the link is supposed to work until 8 pm EST tomorrow.  This interview started out a bit slow, but I did like the visualization in the tapping session.  I used grapes as an addiction, since I've been eating them today even though I'm not hungry.  The therapist has you make a picture of the addiction in your mind, let the size grow really big in your mind, and then let it shrink back.  It was quite a visual, kinda scary when it got huge, and more in control as it shrank.  Later I ate a few more grapes, and felt really full fast.  When I'm alone and eat when I'm not hungry, I tend to eat way past full.  So it will be interesting if the tapping visualization creates control over appetite as well as behavior. 

I think there's still another session on eating addiction coming up in the next few days, so I'll post that one when it's available. 

http://www.tappingworldsummit.com/live/mercola/greenRoom_Day6_EFT.html

Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 15, 2010, 05:40:00 PM
Thanks for describing that visualization, TalkingRat.† Iíve done that kind of visualization before.† Iíll have to do it again.† Itís helpful.

WARNING: really gross and disgusting info to follow Ė continue reading at your own risk.

Quote
It would be wonderful to discover some simple and easily remedied underlying nutritional cause (of my sugar cravings).
Well, ah Ė this may turn out to be a simple and easily remedied underlying cause, but it wasnít what I had in mind when I wrote the above quote.† It turns out that I have parasites, roundworms to be exact.† One came out looking like a very dead piece of spaghetti.† Totally disgusting, but not as much so if it had been alive.† Before that I had had strands of mucus that I wrongly assumed were from psyllium, flax, or chia seeds.†

I did a lot of research on parasites.† It turns out that they are a lot more common than youíd think.† You donít need to travel to some far off country to get them.† Some people recommend that you get yourself (not just your pets) wormed regularly.† Hereís some info for anyone who wants to deworm themselves: http://www.naturalhealthtechniques.com/SpecificDiseases/parasitesintestinal.htm

My theory is that Iíve had them for awhile and that my dietary changes from following this non-addictive diet starting killing them off.† Iíve stopped feeding them the simple carbs and sugar that they crave, and have been unwittingly eating foods that harm them such as carrots, beets, black walnuts, and wild greens.† But I donít really know for sure.† I got some prescription medication.† I researched natural remedies, but it sounds like drugs work a lot better and are pretty safe.† Iíll be curious to see if my cravings lessen or if my health improves.† So far nothing has changed, but it might take a week or two to notice a difference.†

The new update to report with my enlightened tasting experiments is that the texture of some of my most addictive foods is starting to be less appealing.† Also, I keep thinking that something is going to taste really good, but then the flavor changes to unappealing really fast.†

So far my most addictive foods are things that go back to childhood.† They arenít the foods that I crave as an adult.† This is an unexpected discovery.† The things that I crave now have their roots in childhood addictions that Iíd forgotten about.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on June 15, 2010, 06:28:18 PM
Here's the second audio with Gloria Arenson, "Releasing Your Cravings and Compulsive Eating Habits to Lose Weight and Feel Great!"† I wasn't as impressed with this one, but here it is...

http://www.tappingworldsummit.com/live/mercola/greenRoom_day8_gloria.html


I hope you're feeling better.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: goblyn on June 16, 2010, 06:07:31 AM
Wow Heidi, that's crazy.  You're right though, parasites are WAY more common than people think.  In the US we're taught in schools that parasites affect poor third world nations and that's about it, but the truth is that there are so many ways to catch parasites that have nothing to do with drinking water or tainted food.  If you have pets or have even just set foot on a farm, chances are you've exposed yourself to parasites.  The good news is that in the US we have access to medication and clean foods so most people who have parasitic infections end up getting rid of them naturally (by eating food that is not contaminated, and thus preventing further infestations) or inadvertantly (such as taking an antibiotic for a sinus infection, or other medication that kills them, or like you said, eating food that naturally kills them).

I agree, some of the "natural" cures for parasites can have worse side effects than the parasites themselves.  My uncle had gone through a crazy health food phase where he was taking wormwood capsules, as he was convinced he had some sort of parasites (wormwood is a natural herbal remedy for parasites, hence the name, also the ingredient in absinthe, well a variety of it anyways), and they were causing him to have all kinds of interesting reactions, the worst of which was he had some sort of allergic reaction to it, the stress of which triggered an outbreak of shingles!

Anyways, hope you get rid of them soon!  Its nice to know we live somewhere you can easily get treated for it though!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 16, 2010, 04:00:08 PM
Thanks TalkingRat and Goblyn for your support.  This is definitely powerful motivation for eliminating sugar and simple carbs from oneís diet.  Without realizing it Iíve been following a good diet for parasite elimination.  It works.  Now if I can just start to feel better. 
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: nougat on June 16, 2010, 08:58:16 PM
 :shock:
hope you soon get rid of them and feel great again.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 24, 2010, 03:34:41 PM
Thanks nougat!

Just a quick update to say that I've been feeling much better.  My energy is back to normal (I'd been feeling really tired) and the wired/restless/stressed feeling that I had went away.  However, I still have the same level of appetite and cravings, which due to the pms time of the month is a lot.  I guess my cravings are hormonally based, not due to parasites. 

I'm off to the beach for the weekend to celebrate my parent's 50 wedding anniversary.  There will be lots of food!  I'm curious to see what temptations I've lost my cravings for.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on June 24, 2010, 06:08:05 PM
Glad your energy is back.  Have fun at the party. 
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on June 29, 2010, 05:02:49 PM
Thanks TalkingRat!† Iím still feeling better and sleeping so much better.† Iím going to do another round of deworming.† Iím still seeing questionable things.

The celebration went well.† I decided to let go of all nose-clipping and enlightened tasting for the 3 day event.† Also, I decided to exert no will power and just let the 3 days be a natural test of where things are at with my non-addictive diet.

Day 1: I ate a very healthy sandwich on multigrain bread.† It was delicious!† I think it was the first sandwich that Iíd eaten since I started the diet.† I was not at all tempted by any of the afternoon snacks that everyone else was feasting upon.† At dinner I had no desire for the roll, or any of the pasta or potato salads at the salad bar.† My lobster was delicious.† But then I ate french fries.† I havenít deconditioned french fries at all!† There was a chocolate cake with chocolate frosting, which didnít taste good at all to me Ė yay!† But there was also an unusual almond flavored Boston cream pie kind of cake for my nieceís birthday.† It was unlike anything that Iíd deconditioned and it tasted good.† I ate a few slices.

Day 2: I ate a sandwich wrap, lots of vegies, and a bit more lobster and crab meat.† Once again I wasnít tempted by all the junky snacks.† But then I pigged out at the anniversary dinner.† Lots of stuffing, sweet potato fries, roll and butter.† The food was exceptionally good and I overate.† I ate until I was really full but not to the point of discomfort.† Then more of that birthday cake later.

Day 3: A muffin and stuffed shrimp leftovers for breakfast.† (I usually never eat breakfast.)† There were 3 kinds of muffins.† One tasted yucky, another so-so, a third kind was good.† I probably would have like all 3 before I did any deconditioning.† My cravings were ramped up from all of the previous nightís indulgences.† The rest of the day I consumed more leftovers but didnít over indulge.† I didnít like the feeling of cravings being ramped up.

1st day back: relieved to be back home to my usual eating patterns.† Carb cravings are still ramped up.† I had a roll with butter and some crackers.† The rest of what I ate was healthy and non-addictive.

2nd day home: I feel like Iím back to where I was before I left.† I was pleasantly surprised by how fast I returned to my usual groove.† I was worried that Iíd be craving bread and carbs for days, but that didnít happen.†

So I was a bit disappointed that my deconditioning didnít hold up better than it did.† But compared to previous family gatherings I did exceptionally well.† It actually was a shock to see how much junk everyone consumed.† In general I ate less.† I was more aware of how detrimental junk food is and yet dismayed at how easy it is to get hooked back into it.† My brother and nephew have type 1 diabetes.† †I couldnít help but feel that their diet was especially bad for their diabetes.†

My deconditioning of chips has continued to hold.† Iíve definitely made progress with chocolate, which is huge.† Ordinary bread doesnít seduce me, but certain kinds of bread still suck me in.† Itís somewhat daunting how many flavors and kinds of desserts there are.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: fbnops on July 03, 2010, 10:06:53 AM
I was more aware of how detrimental junk food is and yet dismayed at how easy it is to get hooked back into it.† My brother and nephew have type 1 diabetes.† †I couldnít help but feel that their diet was especially bad for their diabetes.†
 

I am reading a book on diabetes: "Dr. Bernstein's Complete Diabetes Solution".† Bernstein's recommendations for a diabetic diet are more conservative than the American Diabetes Association recommendations, and are very much along the lines of my current ideas of a healthful diet for myself.† Bernstein also recognizes the addictiveness of "treat" foods.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: LittlePlum on July 04, 2010, 02:40:14 PM
Interesting thread...

I recently read a book by a British nutritionist called Zoe Harcombe, along similar lines to your addictive foods idea, Heidi.

Her diet involves eliminating all processed foods and eating meals where you never eat starch and fat together as a method of controlling insulin response (you could eat brown rice and veggies in a tomato sauce for one meal for eg, then steak and veggies for the next).

She's also big on food intolerances (something I don't have much knowledge about I must say) and her thinking is that a strong craving for a food signals that in fact this is a food that your body can't cope with, or that signals a problem within your system. For eg, sugar addicts often have candida overgrowth. She also says that at the beginning stages, whatever you feel you simply cannot live without - that is the foodstuff you really need to eliminate! For me this would be sugar...and coffee! Her method is to follow a short but very strict intro diet whereby you work out if you have any of these food intolerances, then gradually add foods back in while keeping to her no fats with carbs rules.

I know several people who have felt very well and lost a fair bit of weight following her advice.

I definitely think that certain types of food keep me on an addictive cycle of eating - refined sugar, white foods, juices rather whole fruits etc. I've always felt "at peace" when I have managed to sustain longer periods of eating wholefoods and cutting back on grains.

I am not familiar with the deconditioning process you mention, but I will now beetle off and do some research!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on July 10, 2010, 11:38:52 AM
Thanks fbnops.† Iím assuming that Dr. Bernstein recommends a lower carb diet.† Low carb seems especially important for diabetics.† It seems wrong to recommend otherwise as Iím assuming the American Diabetes Association does.

Thanks LittlePlum for detailing Zoe Harcombeís diet plan.† Not eating starch and fat together is definitely a good idea for lowering the addictiveness of foods.† Fat really accelerates the addictiveness of carbs.†

So far for me strong cravings = strong opioid addiction.† Perhaps there may also be a food intolerance component to some of the things that I crave.

Quote
I am not familiar with the deconditioning process you mention, but I will now beetle off and do some research!
I just made up the deconditioning process that Iíve been writing about.† But let me know if your research turns up anyone else doing something similar.

UPDATE: Things are continuing to go well.† These past few days Iíve been offered bread, rice, and noodles.† I had absolutely no desire for any of them.† This would have been unheard of for me before I started this non-addictive food diet.

I talked to my friend who had lost (and then gained back) a lot of weight on SLD.† She was inspired by what Iím doing and is going to give it a try.†

I realized recently that I needed to decondition combinations of foods.† For example, Iíve successfully deconditioned my cravings for peanut butter and have made good progress with chocolate, but when combined together they are still addictive.† I need to decondition them in combination as well as separately.† Heightened combinations of foods are almost like a completely new item flavor wise.† So this week Iíve been adding butter, cream cheese, or chocolate to all the foods that Iím deconditioning.

I also wanted to mention that even though I am very optimistic about being able to heal my life long addiction to sweets and carbs, I still have many moments of discouragement.† My level of commitment is really strong and Iíve had promising results so far.† I have absolutely no desire to return to what I was doing before.† But it is a long, slow, gradual process.

Also I feel a little bad writing this, but I havenít been completely happy with my weight.† Iíve been maintaining my goal weight of 120 pounds but my body composition is slightly more fat and less muscle than it was last year.† I havenít been exercising as much as I use to.† And I didnít exercise at all for a few months due to exhaustion from what turned out to be the parasites.† Also, Iíve been bloated all the time lately.† It might be from the heat (it has been a hot summer) but I think itís mostly hormonal.†

I was thrilled with my body and weight for an entire year.† I would love to get back to feeling that way again.† But I want to continue the non-addictive diet experiment without any pressure to lose more weight.† Also, right now Iím enjoying exercising purely for pleasure, not because I have to achieve some goal.† Iím not inspired to push myself to exercise more.†

Itís interesting how easily we forget.† Even though I spent almost all of my adult life being 15-30 pounds heavier than I am now, I honestly can not remember what that is like.† A new standard has been established, and now once again Iím not fully happy with my weight.† But overall things are good enough.†

I also started working on some emotional/spiritual conditioning.† Iím trying to condition myself to surrender more and not overreact to things.† Itís been an interesting process so far.† Perhaps Iíll write more about it when I have more time.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on September 17, 2010, 06:23:22 PM
Well, I should rename this diet "The Parasite Elimination Diet".† Unfortunately my worm saga continues and has intensified.† I think I've passed well over a hundred worms.† I've passed at least one every day for weeks.† On some days it's been 4 or 5.† My doctor sent a sample off to the lab to be identified and it came back negative.† From what I've read online, labs in this country are really bad at diagnosing parasites.† I'm awaiting the results of samples that got sent to another lab.† A five-year-old looking at what I'm passing would go, "eewww what's that worm doing in your poop".† It's pretty obvious even though they're dead and deteriorated to one degree or another.† Also, no one has given me any other viable hypothesis on what else they could be.† I have nightmares of one coming out alive, but then it would be easier to get it tested by the lab.† They couldn't call it negative if it was alive and kicking.† I've had lots of cramping and intestinal distress.†

But I'm also beginning to realize that it's the worms that are causing my cravings.† Healing my food addiction should be simple if I can manage to eliminate the parasites.† I'm also concerned that they've migrated to other organs.† Also, the medication that I've been taking doesn't kill the eggs.† I have no idea how long this is going to take.

I had no idea that I had a parasite problem until I started this non-addictive food diet.† I think I've been living with them for a really long time.† Parasites love junk food and simple carbs and rich fatty foods.† No wonder why platinum calories didn't work for me.† The worms love cream.†

I think that they are at the root of a number of chronic health conditions that I have.† I highly recommend that everyone do a parasite herbal cleanse or take a yearly round or two of dewormers.† All animals are regularly dewormed, but not humans.† I think that the entire U.S. medical system is in denial about what a problem worms are in this country.† I don't want to scare anyone, but I'm sure that I'm not the only carb addicted person who has parasites as the cause of their addiction.† I had no signs that I had them until I eliminated all the food that I craved.† I wouldn't have been able to do that without the enlightened tasting.† My cravings sometimes take the form of intense screaming hunger for a something that seems reasonable like a sandwich with cheese and mayo.† I don't know how they're able to convey their hunger like that.† It's pretty remarkable.† I don't like to kill anything.† It's not in my nature.† But it sure is creepy knowing that there's tons of live wiggling worms inside of you.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Sanchiaza on September 17, 2010, 10:38:32 PM
Gosh, Heidi, I'm really sorry that you're still struggling with the worms. Certainly it's been a wake up call for me to deworm regularly.



Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: NTB on September 18, 2010, 03:48:06 PM
Heidi,

Have you tried herbal remedies?† I've heard that thymol, a natural extract from thyme, is particularly effective. Here is a link to "30-day dewormer" based around thymol and other herbs, such as wormwood and black walnut:
http://www.herbsistah.com/pages/parasite_dewormer.html
and Wikipedia indicates it is effective against hookworm (as well as handling mould infections in bee colonies  :D :D -- thought you'd like that!):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thymol

Strangely enough, while looking around, I came across something called "Helminthic therapy" which deliberately infects people with parasitic worms...advocates claims that this is a type of "probiotic therapy" that is effective in treating autoimmune disorders.† Sounds pretty strange to me, but perhaps it works with the right type of worms. Just something to think about before you rid yourself of them worms.† But I could well understand just wanting to be rid of them.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminthic_therapy

Todd

Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on September 18, 2010, 04:39:15 PM
Thanks Sanchiaza.†

(Also thanks Elisavet if you're reading this.† I sorry that I haven't yet responded to your post on my other thread.)

Congrats on achieving your weight loss goal Todd.†

I am familiar with helminthic therapy.† Unfortunately, I have the wrong kind of worms and way too many of them.† I have a number of autoimmune diseases, which my worms are either making worse or not eliminating.† I think it's near impossible to completely eradicate the worms.† I'm just hoping to greatly reduce their numbers.†

I usually treat myself with herbs.† But a lot of the deworming herbs are toxic to one degree or another.† Plus I had the feeling that I really needed something stronger.† My feelings were confirmed by a number of herbalist whom I really respect.† I will switch to a maintenance dose of herbs down the road once I'm sure that the worms have been greatly reduced.†

I'm familiar with the thymol used on the bees.† It's really strong smelling stuff.† The bees hate it.† But maybe it's better than other chemicals used on them.† I like thyme.† So that might be a possibility.† Different foods and herbs are good for eliminating different types of worms.† It's been hard to find specific info on which foods or herbs are best for which type of worm.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: TalkingRat on September 18, 2010, 07:00:33 PM
Sorry you're still fighting this.† Negative lab tests?† On the worms?† Or were they looking only for eggs?† Cuz if your early comments that it was roundworms was right, how could they miss something that obvious?† My only experience is with puppy worms, and it was so obvious there was no need for a lab test.†

I hope the second lab finds something and you can put this behind you.

Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Sanchiaza on September 18, 2010, 10:44:14 PM
There's a book called Prescription for Nutritional Healing (the 4th edition) by Phyllis Balch which has an entry on worms and intestinal parasites plus nutritional and supplement advice to help get rid of them - perhaps your local library has a copy? It may be worth looking at. It does mention specific worms (not all of them, though) and possible remedies for them.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on October 02, 2010, 06:21:21 AM
Thanks TalkingRat and Sanchiaza.† Iím sorry that itís taken me so long to find the time to respond.† Sanchiaza, I have the book that you mentioned.† TalkingRat, Iíll describe my experiences with the labs below.

This whole experience with the worms is absolutely mind-boggling and crazy.† Iím sure that lots of folks here must think that Iím totally whacked.† I think I dropped over some deep Shangri-la self-experimentation cliff a long time ago.† Now Iím wandering through an unfamiliar bardo.† Many thanks to those of you who continue to witness and support my journey.

First of all I just canít believe how many worms have come out of me and that they keep coming.† Secondly, itís so hard to fathom that these creatures are alive and wiggling around inside of me.† Thirdly, Iíve been dealing with a lab and medical system that operates under an entirely different system of reality.† It seems like it should be simple basic science to examine the specimens and determine what they are.† I have been terrified of passing a live worm.† But if one came out alive, then the labs and I would be on the same page.

I have called up the state department of health lab where my stool samples have been sent, in order to try to get some answers as to why my tests results are coming back negative when I am so obviously passing so many worms.† The woman at the lab is really nice and is really trying to help me, but she seems clueless and thinks inside a very rigid box.† According to her only people in third world countries have heavy worm loads.† In this country we have allergies but not worm problems.† All worms come out whole and intact, they donít come out in pieces.† If Iím seeing pieces then it must not be worms.† Roundworms only grow as long as 12 inches.†

For the lab tests they have you collect a very tiny stool sample and put it in a container that has some fluid in it.† I made sure to include a piece of worm.† But the fluid might destroy the worm samples, instead of preserving them.† The woman at the lab looked at my samples under a microscope and thought that it looked like fiber. But maybe she was looking at a piece of fiber and not the piece of worm?† I also sent them a separate worm specimen but she hasnít seen it and doesnít know what happened to it.† (Previously, a different worm specimen was sent to a completely different lab, but it also came back negative.)

So I decided to try some colon hydrotherapy, which is also called a colonic.† Lots of people pass worms during them.† There is a clear tube that runs through the machine so that you can see what is being flushed out of you.† I thought that perhaps I would be able to see and photograph some live worms.† Or perhaps I would be able to get a worm specimen that was in good condition.

I couldnít get my doctor to prescribe more mebendazole yet because of the negative test results.† So I decided to take some pyrantel pamoate dog dewormer a few days before my colon hydrotherapy to increase my chances of passing worms.† Iíd researched it online and pyrantel pamoate is used for humans.† I took a low dose of it.† However, it was really hard to get it down because it was a disgusting butterscotch flavor.† Then I woke up in the night with ridiculous amounts of gas and a bit of a stomachache.† Iíll be reluctant to take it again.

So two days ago I had my colonic.† The procedure was very uncomfortable for me and we didnít see a single worm.† After the procedure I had bad gas pains and felt very uncomfortable for the rest of the day.† The woman who gave me the colonic said that people who have worms have a lot of gas.† But I wondered if the procedure gave me gas.† I was thinking that the colonic wasnít worth it, and that I wasnít going to do it again.

But then yesterday morning (the day after my colonic) I woke up and passed 2 very long worms.† I measured one of them and it was over 2 feet long!† (The other worm was all stuck together and impossible to spread out.)† Later on I also passed a lot more worm pieces, like Iíd been passing all along.† So it seems as though some of the worms might actually be much longer, than I thought.† The worms are white and quite thin.† I find it really hard to believe that a fiber supplement could form a two-foot long thin strand.† Or that I could be passing super long thin strands of mucus. The lab work does not seem to be based on very good science.†

So I am currently trying to get my doctor to prescribe another round of mebendazole.† I am scratching my head as to where to go next in terms of having my worm specimens examined and diagnosed.† I even tried calling a vet, but that didnít get me anywhere.† I had asked my doctor to refer me to a specialist, but he couldnít do that until Iíd gotten some positive lab test results.† Iím reluctant to send my long specimens to a lab that is just going to declare them negative and not determine what they are. The worms that I pass are in various states of disintegration.† Most of the time, they fall apart when I try to retrieve them.† So even though I pass tons of worms, itís hard to get good samples.† I have an appointment with my doctor later this month.† So Iíll show up with my samples and discuss the situation with him then, unless I can come up with some other idea of what to try next.†

I found this fascinating web site of some anonymous self-experimenters who have lyme disease.† They treated themselves with high doses of salt and vitamin C.† Subsequently tons of parasites came out of them.† They got a microscope and took pictures and documented the various parasites. http://www.lymephotos.com/

Somewhere on this journey I realized that I have been in a bodily state of cleansing and purging.† †I think that Iíve had these worms for a long time.† I havenít been nose clipping very much lately.† I still continue to follow the non-addictive food diet and enlightened tasting.† I had no idea that it would lead me into all this.† But on some deep level I know that itís good.†
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Sanchiaza on October 04, 2010, 01:01:24 AM
Gosh, Heidi, you've had an experience  :shock:

Here's hoping for a more enlightened attitude from your healthcare providers.

You're in my thoughts.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: karky on October 04, 2010, 09:44:35 AM
Heidi,
I thought of you this past weekend.
My relatives were laughing about one of the cousins thinking their kid had worms, because they could see them in the diaper.
When they were tested, the "worms" turned out to be banana fibers.


Not that you could have a 2 foot banana fiber.† :shock:
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: nougat on October 05, 2010, 09:16:35 AM
heidi i so hope  you find a solution asap!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 21, 2011, 04:48:22 PM
Hi everyone.  I didnít realize that itís been so long since Iíve given an update on my situation.  I thought it had been about 3 months and Iím amazed to see that almost 7 months have passed!

The first news is that I completely stopped nose-clipping right after my last post.  So absolutely no nose clipping for 6 Ĺ months.  Nose clipping was no longer working for me and was interfering with healing my food addiction.  Perhaps in the future Iíll go back to it.

My parasite symptoms intensified.  I have been passing worms and worm material, 3 times a day, every single day, for 5 months now.  I figured out why I never saw any worms and had no idea that I had them.  I know this is really gross, but the worms died in me and then their carcasses got layered onto my intestines.  Iíve been passing some really old worm material and itís not a pretty sight.  But it sure feels good to get that crap out.  Iíve been corresponding with another woman who has as many worms as I do.  Plus keeping up with info on parasite forums. 

Basically I had a really miserable winter.  I was exhausted and struggling to keep up with things.  Plus it was the worst winter that I can remember weather wise.  Plus I was too sick to go to Florida for a vacation.

About a month or so ago, I got some of my strength and energy back.  I started making and consuming tons of fermented vegetables of all kinds.  I especially like and recommend beet kvass.  Iíve been drinking lots of it.  I eat fermented vegetables at every meal.  Spring has felt exceptionally precious this year. I started hooping again outside in the sun.  I havenít been able to exercise for eons.  It feels heavenly.

I have had near perfect compliance with my non-addictive food diet.  I have continued to taste and spit food that is addictive.  Overall, my food addiction has lessened considerably.  However, I think that the majority of my food addiction is driven by the parasites.  I donít think that Iíll have full success with my diet until I have eliminated all worms.  And who knows how long that will be.  Iíve been assuming that itís going to take another year or more.  I think that Iíve had these worms for at least 24 years, if not my whole life.  Getting rid of them is quite a process.  They are like cockroaches.  They know how to survive, stay undetected, and reproduce.

Weight wise I gained back half of my weight that I lost on SLD.  Ten pounds according to my scale weight first thing in the morning.  However, it seems like a lot more because I have a lot of bloat.  Plus all the weight gain is on my stomach, hips, thighs, and butt.  So basically none of my pants fit.  Itís definitely depressing because I eat very little calorie wise.  My body is comfortable surviving on next to nothing while feeding and breeding thousands of worms.  I am grateful however, that my weight gain hit a plateau.  Plateaus are wonderful when you have been gaining weight!

My highest priority is worm eradication.  Second priority is eliminating all food addiction.  Ideally I would like to have no interest in and even a distaste for all addictive food.  Losing weight is down to third place and doesnít seem likely to happen in the near future.  I need to figure out how to restore my metabolism.  My body holds onto every paltry calorie.  If I cut calories any more Iíd be eating anorexic amounts of food. 

I think that enlightened tasting works but that itís a really slow process. If you donít have worms, then perhaps it might go faster.  Each food item and combination of foods must be individually deconditioned.  A few foods (whipped cream, butter, high quality chocolate) are taking an exceptionally long time to decondition.  I know that heavy cream and butter are the wormís absolute favorite foods.  Iím not sure about chocolate.  When Iíve been at functions with lots of baked goods and other temptations, Iíve been able to refrain from eating anything that is not on my diet.  This in itself is an amazing accomplishment.  However, I really want to get to the place where I have absolutely no interest in those foods.  I know itís a bit extreme, but I have been at the mercy of parasites and food addiction for a long time. 

I had no idea when I began SLD 3.5 years ago that it would be such a wild and crazy journey.  I really want to fully heal the root of my food addiction.  Nose-clipping took me part way there.  But to heal on a deeper level I needed to let go of it and focus on the enlightened tasting.  Hopefully I will soon abandon that tool, too.  I see the light at the end of this dark tunnel.  But who knows how many more crazy things I might have to do before I reach it.  Wishing everyone good steady progress.  Some things take a long time!
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: shovelqueen on April 21, 2011, 05:15:03 PM
Whew! That is quite a journey, Heidi!  Glad to hear that you are feeling better with spring and an end is in sight, even if a ways away.  Very few of us oldtimers around anymore. 
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: VeganKitten on April 21, 2011, 05:53:22 PM
Have the parasites been medically confirmed?

There is such a thing as Delusory Parasitosis:
http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/dtopics/pests/dp.html
http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/20/1/112
http://cmr.asm.org/cgi/content/full/22/4/690
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11372814?dopt=Abstract

According to what I've read, this disorder is more than twice as common in women than men, and most prevalent in middle-age and older patients. Medication has been successful in some cases.

I hope you can soon find some relief!

Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 22, 2011, 05:09:35 PM
Thanks SQ.  It sounds like the Whole 30 Challenge is going exceptionally well for you.

Have the parasites been medically confirmed?

There is such a thing as Delusory Parasitosis:
http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/dtopics/pests/dp.html
http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/20/1/112
http://cmr.asm.org/cgi/content/full/22/4/690
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11372814?dopt=Abstract

According to what I've read, this disorder is more than twice as common in women than men, and most prevalent in middle-age and older patients. Medication has been successful in some cases.

I hope you can soon find some relief!

Hi VK!  I hope that things are going well for you.

Delusional parasitosis is a bit of a touchy subject for me. 

Unfortunately I have come to the conclusion that the medical system in the US is delusory concerning the existence of human parasites.  Iím sure that there are people who legitimately suffer from delusional parasitosis.  But unfortunately I think that there are also lots of people who actually have parasites, who have been diagnosed with delusional parasitosis instead.  Ironically, some psyche meds are effective for certain kinds of parasites. 

The type of parasite that I have, Ascaris lumbricoides, is THE most common human parasite.  Billions of people have it.  Chances are pretty high that you (meaning anyone reading this) have a few of them in your intestines. (Just like your dog or cat is likely to have Toxacara canis or Toxacara cati the equivalent roundworm species that infects them.) Ascaris lumbricoides is long (1 foot to over 2 feet) but thin.  Humans can also be infected with Toxacara but those are smaller.  Also, Ascaris suum the roundworm associated with pigs can infest humans.  Those ones are thicker and larger. 

I have passed ridiculous numbers of Ascaris lumbricoides in all stages of decay, except for alive and mint condition.  The evidence in the toilet is not a hallucination. (A five-year-old child could easily identify an intact ascaris specimen as a worm.)  I have had my husband and also a close friend examine the parasite material that I have passed.  They both agree that I am passing just one kind of parasite in a huge range of stages of decay.  My husband jokes that I should collect the evidence in a bucket and bring it to the doctors.  Because I see tons of worms in all these graduated stages, it makes it obvious that it is all the same organism.  My ability to identify Ascaris has gotten quite good because Iíve seen so much of it, in so many states.

When I sent 2 foot long specimens to 2 different labs, the lab tests came back negative.  But they also did not identify what it is.  I have personally spoken to the people in the labs and many doctors and alternative health professionals.  Most of them are uneducated and clueless concerning parasites.  The honest ones will admit that they donít know much and canít help you.  But unfortunately the rest spread misinformation.  Some of the standard medical information about ascaris is wrong.  If you have a significant parasite problem, then you are likely to get better help and diagnosis in a third world country.  Medical tourism is becoming common for this affliction.  I have heard of people traveling to places like Cuba and Panama and receiving better care.  If you travel to less developed countries, it is recommended that you get tested and treated for parasites before you come home.

I wish that I had been more educated about parasites.  It would have saved me years of suffering.  For me it is the root cause of a number of chronic health conditions.  It is empowering to finally know what is really wrong with me after all these years.  So many unexplained pieces have fallen into place and now make sense. 

If it hadnít happened to me, then I never would have believed that it was possible to harbor so many large worms and not know about it. (However, I think that if I had looked carefully and knew what to look for, then I probably would have seen an occasional sign.)  Many people with eating disorders have parasites at the root of their problem.  Anorexia, food addiction, obesity, or an inability to gain weight could all be parasite related.  Also, anxiety disorders and sleeping problems, as well as a slew of other illness, may have parasites as the root cause. The medical system believes that we donít have a problem with parasites in this country.  So they donít even suspect parasites to be a problem.  Then the lab tests they use are completely ineffective.  I hope that posting the details of my experience helps to educate other people.  Perhaps someone else may resolve a long standing health or diet issue by considering the possibility that parasites may be a contributing cause. 
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Seth Roberts on April 22, 2011, 06:13:30 PM
That's a fascinating and enlightening story, Heidi. I'm glad you're feeling better. I have told Tim Beneke how you used enlightened tasting, which he originally called "enlightened bulimia". How did you first come to suspect and then realize you had worms?
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: VeganKitten on April 22, 2011, 11:24:47 PM
I can definitely see how it would be a touchy subject, sorry if I offended you. I wonder why labs aren't able to identify specimens though, in so many cases? It seems like quite a widespread phenomenon to be completely missing out on -- if that's what's happening. If a 'lay person'/amateur expert can identify species on sight... there should be no mystery. Especially if you don't even need a microscope.

 I'm looking up Ascaris lumbricoides - Giant Roundworm! Definitely no microscope required!  :o
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascaris_lumbricoides
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 23, 2011, 04:57:23 PM
That's a fascinating and enlightening story, Heidi. I'm glad you're feeling better. I have told Tim Beneke how you used enlightened tasting, which he originally called "enlightened bulimia". How did you first come to suspect and then realize you had worms?

lol Seth. ďEnlightened bulimiaĒ is a humorous name for it.  Though probably only to someone who does it, and it definitely won't help to promote it.  Do you know if Tim Beneke was able to eliminate his food cravings by doing it?  He probably hasnít done it as much as I have.  I do tend to be exceptionally thorough in my experimentation.  

On April 16 of last year, I stopped consuming all addictive food and started ďenlightened bulimiaĒ.  Soon after I started not feeling well.  I had a hard time sleeping and would wake during the night feeling really wired.  I was puzzled that I didnít feel well, because I knew that my diet was healthier than it had been before.  

At the beginning of June I started seeing an occasional worm wrapped around my stool.  I freaked out and couldnít deal with it at first.  My husband convinced me that it was probably a worm and to go to a doctor and get it checked out.  Thankfully, heís not squeamish about these kinds of things.  The first practitioner I saw glanced at my specimen and diagnosed me with ascaris, which is what I thought it was from doing some online research.  Initially, I thought I had a handful of worms that would be easy to kill with a few rounds of deworming meds.  It wasnít until 6 or 7 months later that the full extent of my problem became clear.  

I was extremely sick over 20 years ago.  I saw many health practitioners, both medical and alternative, but I never got a diagnosis that felt right.  It took many years of hard work and good health practices before I got well enough to work and function again.  But I never got fully better and had lingering symptoms.  I couldnít shake the feeling that there was something really wrong with me underneath.  So itís a tremendous relief to finally know what my problem is after all these years.  But Iím also grieving the loss of so much of my life.  For example, I never was well enough to have children.  Also, Iíve only been able to work part time and that has been a struggle financially.  I never had the energy levels that most people have and always had to be careful not to do too much.  Plus I had an odd assortment of symptoms that didnít make sense until now.

The enlightened tasting has been and continues to be enlightening.  On a visceral experiential level you understand how you have conditioned your body to like and crave specific foods.  Thereís a feeling like Iím unraveling a lifetime of perpetually reinforced addiction.  

Also, I suspect that thereís something about enlightened tasting that is detrimental to the worms.  Maybe my body secretes enzymes in anticipation of digesting all this rich and junky food.  But then the enzymes help to digest the worms instead.  Iím just making a guess here.  But tasting and spitting out sports drinks did improve athletic function.  See: http://boards.sethroberts.net/index.php?topic=7018.0  So there is some kind of physical response to it.  

My journey to healing has been so wild and crazy Ė from nose clipping most of my food, to tasting and spitting addictive food, to passing tons of worms Ė and itís not over yet!  Each thing emerged from the wake of what preceded it.  Itís not an option to turn back.  I just have to see it through to the end.  
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 23, 2011, 05:01:19 PM
I can definitely see how it would be a touchy subject, sorry if I offended you. I wonder why labs aren't able to identify specimens though, in so many cases? It seems like quite a widespread phenomenon to be completely missing out on -- if that's what's happening. If a 'lay person'/amateur expert can identify species on sight... there should be no mystery. Especially if you don't even need a microscope.

 I'm looking up Ascaris lumbricoides - Giant Roundworm! Definitely no microscope required!  :o
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascaris_lumbricoides

Thanks VK.  No problem about your post.  I wasnít offended because I knew that you had no idea how difficult itís been for me (and most folks on the parasite forums) to get medical help.  You just stimulated me to jump on my soapbox!  I worried that my doctor was going to diagnose me with delusional parasitosis, but fortunately he didnít.  However, he did believe the lab tests more than the worm specimens that I brought in.  In general doctors have moved away from physical exams and physical evidence.  Instead they completely rely on tests, which I think is problematic, especially if the tests turn out to be wrong.  Some people have brought their worm specimens to a vet and said that they were from their dog.  They were easily able to get a diagnosis from the vet.  Vets are much more experienced in parasite diagnosis.  

The whole experience continues to be unbelievable to me.  I canít quite wrap my mind around the facts that I have so many large creatures residing in me, and that the labs and doctors canít identify something so large and obvious
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Seth Roberts on April 23, 2011, 06:03:16 PM
Thanks for the additional details, they really help put your story in context.

"Enlightened bulimia" although humorous was not a good name for it because it didn't involve food already in the stomach (bulimia). It just involved spitting out food you have tasted -- which is what wine tasters do. Since there isn't anything wrong with spitting stuff out "enlightened" isn't an especially good word either. . . . Not that I have a better name in mind. Now that it is clear it can be so helpful perhaps a better name would be a good idea. It is not so popular that it is too late to change the name .... :)

In any case what about the possibility that the enlightened tasting helped because it caused you to eat less junk food? Less junk food, less worms. Because the junk food was so calorie-rich, the calories in them survived further into the digestive process -- that is, further into your intestines. Whereas with ordinary food, most of the calories are removed early.

someone should create a website where we can nominate people for Stupidest Doctor in America. . . . Not being able to realize that a worm is a worm is egregious.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 25, 2011, 07:40:47 AM
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It is not so popular that it is too late to change the name ....

lol, it is probably one of the most unpopular dietary tools ever!  Most people have a terrible reaction to it.  I think that its chances of becoming popular are about nil. The few people who know that I do it are sworn to secrecy about it.  Very few people are interested in trying it.  I usually just refer to it as ďtaste and spitĒ.  Iím open to calling it something else if you or anyone else has any good ideas.  It definitely could use a name that spruces up its image a bit, because its image is so low.

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In any case what about the possibility that the enlightened tasting helped because it caused you to eat less junk food? Less junk food, less worms.

Well I didnít eat much junk food to begin with.  But I did come to the conclusion that the food I was addicted to was actually the food that the worms were addicted to.  Lots of food that is non-addictive is food that may be harmful to them in some way.

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Because the junk food was so calorie-rich, the calories in them survived further into the digestive process -- that is, further into your intestines. Whereas with ordinary food, most of the calories are removed early.

That is an interesting idea, but most non-addictive food is high in fiber.  Wouldnít the fiber slow down the digestion of the food and the removal of calories?  Also some calorie rich food such as fish, fish oil, and flax is not addictive and okay.

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someone should create a website where we can nominate people for Stupidest Doctor in America. . . . Not being able to realize that a worm is a worm is egregious.
I find myself more exasperated by the system than the individual doctors.  The system seems incredibly stupid and backward with regards to parasites.  Most doctors have blind trust in the system.  They canít think outside of the box.  If the lab tests say that it isnít a worm, well then by golly it must be something else.  They are unable to consider the possibility that the labs might be wrong.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Seth Roberts on April 25, 2011, 03:28:51 PM
By "junk food" I meant the food to which you were addicted. I should have called it "addictive food".

I agree, it is the system that is at fault, but the system consists of individuals. Including individual doctors. I wonder what your doctor would have said if you asked why he trusted the lab results. A surgeon once told me I should get a certain surgery. The evidence, she said, showed I would benefit. I couldn't find the evidence and asked her for it. She said she would find it for me and never did. I blogged about this. She got upset. That was revealing and helpful, I think.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: NTB on April 25, 2011, 05:06:51 PM
I have passed ridiculous numbers of Ascaris lumbricoides in all stages of decay, except for alive and mint condition.  The evidence in the toilet is not a hallucination. (A five-year-old child could easily identify an intact ascaris specimen as a worm.)  I have had my husband and also a close friend examine the parasite material that I have passed.  They both agree that I am passing just one kind of parasite in a huge range of stages of decay.  My husband jokes that I should collect the evidence in a bucket and bring it to the doctors. 

Hi Heidi,

Your travails are riveting. I've been away from the SLD forum for a while but I have set an "alert" on a few threads of particular interest.  Your story is not only a personal interest story that could easily grace the pages of the New York Times Magazine or a Malcolm Gladwell column in the New Yorker--but I think it rises to the worthiness of an illustrative example for a parasitology article in Scientific American or Nature.  It is hard to get out of one's mind.

I think your husband's suggestion is not a mere joke. Why don't you collect a "specimen" and bring it to the doctors?  And if the local yokels aren't perceptive enough, persist and dirve a some additional miles to a university medical center that has a good parasitology department.

One additional thought:  Sometimes the solution to an "infection" (which parasite infestation is) is not chemical warfare (antiobiotics) or starvation (removing the favored substrate) but rather competition (introducing a competitive parasite, bacterium or other intestinal microbe).  Perhaps there are "probiotic" approaches to crowding out those long little buggers by introducing a more biocompatible parasite.  I've read that helminthic therapy -- introducing innocuous parasites -- helps people overcome allergies which are due to how the immune system overreacts when the IgE immune response is underdeveloped.  The preferred parasite species is Necator americanus (commonly known as hookworms) or Trichuris suis.  These parasites are relatively innocuous -- at least they don't drain you of energy.  What about using helminthic therapy to deliberately infect yourself with competitor to Acaris lumbricoides, driving it out and overtaking its niche in your intestines? 

You've probably considered this, but if so, I'm interested in hearing what you've learned.

Good luck.  And enjoy the spring after the long New England winter!

Todd
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on April 27, 2011, 04:45:32 PM
Quote
Your travails are riveting. I've been away from the SLD forum for a while but I have set an "alert" on a few threads of particular interest. Your story is not only a personal interest story that could easily grace the pages of the New York Times Magazine or a Malcolm Gladwell column in the New Yorker--but I think it rises to the worthiness of an illustrative example for a parasitology article in Scientific American or Nature. It is hard to get out of one's mind.
Thanks Todd, but I was thinking it seems more like a bad horror flick.  My story is very common on parasite forums.

Quote
I think your husband's suggestion is not a mere joke. Why don't you collect a "specimen" and bring it to the doctors? And if the local yokels aren't perceptive enough, persist and drive a some additional miles to a university medical center that has a good parasitology department.
My husband was suggesting that I collect a large volume of parasite material.  I have brought specimens to doctors.  They glance at them briefly through the bag and container.  They donít look at them closely.  My parents desperately want me to travel to a university medical center.  However, so many people on the parasite forums have been to infectious disease specialists and not been helped.  Since my energy levels have been compromised, Iíve chosen to just treat myself for now.  It is extremely easy and relatively inexpensive to get parasite meds online.  My self-treatment has been going well so far.  If I get stuck, then Iíll make another stab at getting medical help.  

Quote
One additional thought: Sometimes the solution to an "infection" (which parasite infestation is) is not chemical warfare (antiobiotics) or starvation (removing the favored substrate) but rather competition (introducing a competitive parasite, bacterium or other intestinal microbe). Perhaps there are "probiotic" approaches to crowding out those long little buggers by introducing a more biocompatible parasite. I've read that helminthic therapy -- introducing innocuous parasites -- helps people overcome allergies which are due to how the immune system overreacts when the IgE immune response is underdeveloped. The preferred parasite species is Necator americanus (commonly known as hookworms) or Trichuris suis. These parasites are relatively innocuous -- at least they don't drain you of energy. What about using helminthic therapy to deliberately infect yourself with competitor to Acaris lumbricoides, driving it out and overtaking its niche in your intestines?
If only there was very clear knowledge that certain beneficial parasites competed with ascaris.  Most people who have the worm loads that I have, typically have multiple kinds.  I suspect that various parasites reinforce each other in not so beneficial ways.  There is even a type of parasite that thrives on probiotics.  

I thought about fecal implants, which are being used with great success for Clostridium Difficile infections.  (It would be a natural next step for me to continue to escalate the gross factor. :o )  I was amazed at how fast one implant could transform gut flora.  (See: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/science/13micro.html?_r=1 (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/science/13micro.html?_r=1)) But it seems like something to try only if youíre desperately sick and nothing else is working.  Iíve never heard of it being done for parasites.  More research on people who have good gut ecology and what can be done to transform bad gut ecology is needed.  I think that good gut ecology is probably key to good health and easy weight loss.

I am working on a probiotic approach by consuming large quantities of cultured vegetables.  Iím hesitant to take much yogurt or kefir because the parasites especially love milk.  Iíve been thinking about making pumpkinseed kefir or kombucha brewed with antiparasite herbs.

I also intended to post an update about my non-addictive diet on your forum.  But this update ended up being parasite focused and somewhat off topic.  It seemed more appropriate to just post my parasite saga on this forum because of my long history here.

However, Iíve been thrilled to see that your forum is doing so well.  (If anyone here hasnít checked it out, I highly recommend it.  Itís loaded with great info and Toddís articles are excellent.  See: http://www.gettingstronger.org/ (http://www.gettingstronger.org/) and http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php (http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php))

Have you seen this article on parasite infection and immune responses in M.S.?  Iíd been meaning to e-mail you the link.  I actually haven't read it but I thought you would be into it. http://www.direct-ms.org/pdf/HygieneMS/Parasite%20infection%20MS%20Annals%20Neur%2007.pdf (http://www.direct-ms.org/pdf/HygieneMS/Parasite%20infection%20MS%20Annals%20Neur%2007.pdf)

Thanks again Todd.  As always it's great to converse with you.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Seth Roberts on April 27, 2011, 05:29:30 PM
Quote
It seemed more appropriate to just post my parasite saga on this forum because of my long history here.

And I am glad you have. it's really interesting and instructive.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on July 28, 2012, 01:48:49 PM
Okay, so the strange formatting in a long narrow box seems to show up just on my first post.  Maybe it's punishment for not posting in a long time. lol!  I'm not sure if this post appears to others that way.  And what to do to fix it.  It looks fine on the recent post page.  I moved my long update post below this one and now that looks fine.  I flagged Seth about it.  But I think I fixed the problem because my "real" post looks okay now.  But if anyone else has this problem or knows more about it feel free to chime in.  Thanks.
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on July 28, 2012, 02:01:10 PM
Hey all old and new Shangri-la Diet friends.  Hope everyone is doing well.  And hope that each of you make steady gradual progress towards your weight loss goals. 

Iíve been meaning to post an update on my long and crazy journey.  I am doing well.  Itís taken two years of intensive parasite cleansing, but Iím finally starting to feel better!  (Knock-wood that it continues!!!)  Iím still in the throes of parasite cleansing, but am passing what appears to me to be a much older layer of parasite buildup.  Iíve been taking lemon, lime, and V8 style vegetable juices to break down and dissolve that layer.  I also drink really tasty kombucha that I brew, and eat lots of fermented vegetables that I culture.  My husband did an enormous garden this year.  So the bulk of my diet consists of very fresh veggies and wild edible weeds.  My diet is extremely healthy.  No grains, no sweeteners (except stevia), no junk food, no processed food, and only occasional small amounts of low fat cultured dairy.

Tasting and spitting really helped to cut my food addiction to manageable levels, but has not eliminated it entirely as Iíd hoped.  It seems as though thereís an endless amount of food to decondition and each individual food takes time. (Itís also hard for me to know how much of my food addiction is due to parasites.)  Iíve learned a lot through two years of tasting and spitting.  For example, dark chocolate is an incredibly addictive food substance for me.  I use to like milk chocolate more but that was much easier to decondition.  I know dark chocolate is supposed to have lots of good healing properties, but Iíve come to the conclusion that it is really not good for me.  Iíd be relieved to never desire it again.

So taste and spit is a replacement addiction that moved me in the right direction, but Iím ready to be done with it.  It might be too soon to completely wean myself from it.  But I am feeling weary of it, which is a good sign!  I have been gradually attempting to cut back for a few months now.  Iím feeling my way with it.  I have more stress in my life at the moment, and that always makes addiction elimination trickier.  If I cut back too drastically, it seems like I rebound back into overwhelming cravings.  So Iím trying to move steadily in the direction of weaning myself, without being too extreme.  Even though Iíd like to be completely done with it, I probably need to still do it to a lessor degree for awhile. 

Since Iíve been attempting to cut back on tasting and spitting, Iíve increased my consumption of calorie free flavors (CFF).  I drink a lot of different flavors of herbal tea sweetened with stevia.  CFF is an extremely helpful component of SLD that tends to be overlooked.

When I first started the non-addictive diet and parasite cleansing, I gained back about half of the weight that Iíd lost on SLD.  But then I managed to hold my weight steady.  And then gradually and incrementally Iíve pushed my weight back down.  I am now happily below my goal weight, but scale weight is deceptive!  My body composition is now more fat and less muscle.  So I am a pant size higher than what I was two years ago when I achieved and maintained my goal. 

Ideally I would love to build back the muscle that I had then.  Iím finally feeling well enough to increase the intensity of my exercise, but I also just started a new job and so my time has been more limited.  Also, my muscle development a few years ago was from jogging.  Iím not sure that my body can sustain the stress of that kind of high impact repetitive exercise. 

Iím still hooping a lot and loving it!  My skills keep steadily increasing.  Recently, I felt a shift like my core muscles had gotten even stronger.  Having a stronger core is an incredible feeling! 

In general, Iíve been much more relaxed about the whole weight and exercise thing.  I feel confident that Iíll be able to get to and maintain my ideal weight and body composition once again.  Steady and persistent is the way.  I know the rhythm of maintaining and consolidating gains.  After awhile, my body will make another incremental shift of dropping a few pounds or building some muscle.  I can feel that my body/set-point are dependably moving in the right direction.  I have a much deeper understanding and knowledge of weight loss and addiction issues, then when I started SLD many years ago.  Iím attuned to and working with my body, itís rhythms, and the rhythms of my life.  I trust my body and the weight loss process.  Itís a nice feeling to have trust!  But I also want to stay humble, because thereís always unexpected changes and more to learn.

Also, just for the record I am no longer nose clipping (except for some foul tasting parasite meds).  I still live by and follow SLD principles.  But I am now able to get to and maintain a good weight without nose clipping, oil slugging, or sugar water.  And hopefully soon without tasting and spitting. (My husband thinks that the tasting and spitting large quantities of addictive foods contributed to my weight gain.  He might be right.  I havenít been entirely sure about this.  I know I needed it as an in between step and that the level of my cravings has been greatly reduced by doing it.  But the process of tasting lots of flavors of highly addictive food might have a counterproductive element to it as well. ) 

For me the flavor of addictive foods is what drives the addiction cycle and weight gain.  One doesnít need to eat a completely bland or flavorless diet in order to lose weight.  Some of the foods that I eat and enjoy are spicy and flavorful, BUT those foods do not create an addictive reaction in my body. 

Identifying and cutting back the foods that are addictive to my body has been key.  Plain whole grain bread, plain crackers, potatoes, butter, and cream are examples of very bland foods that have an addictive reaction in my body.  It is best for me not to consume them.  Itís been a long, long time since Iíve had a good sandwich.  I crave a good sandwich, potatoes, butter, cream, goat cheese, and very dark chocolate more than I crave junk food.  Addiction is subtle.  There are lots of healthy good foods that my body responds to like an addict.  This has been the most eye-opening part of this long and crazy journey for me.  Addiction is personal and unique to each personís body.  I was completely unaware of how addicted I was to certain foods simply because I believed that those foods were healthy and good for me.  I still believe that those foods are healthy and good for many people, but I now know beyond any doubt that they are not good for me.  What a relief it is to be in touch with clear dietary knowledge that comes from within, instead of following an external authority.  Self-knowledge and empowerment have been the priceless gifts and rewards of this journey. 

Perhaps somewhere down the road when all parasites have been eliminated, Iíll be able to consume some of these foods once again.  Who knows?  Iím not sure what kind of crazy twist or turn is coming next.  Iíll just have to wait and see.



Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: shovelqueen on July 29, 2012, 05:43:48 AM
Well, Hello, Heidi!  Wonderful to hear from you.  I still read these forums, though they have been quite quiet of late.  Don't post much.  I still use the oil shots on occasion, not regularly. 

I have transitioned over to a mostly Primal way of eating in the past year.  It avoids most grains, legumes, processed and junk foods.  I feel so much better off of grains.  I'm also not running any more, just sort of lost interest in it.

I'm so glad that you are doing well and feeling so at peace in your body.  All the best!

SQ
Title: Re: The Non-Addictive Food Diet
Post by: Heidi 555 on July 29, 2012, 04:35:23 PM
Hi SQ,

Nice to catch up with you, too!  Our years of doing SLD and exercise challenges together have made a lasting impact.  It sounds like our diets are similar now, though I eat some legumes.  I'm surprised to hear that you lost interest in running.  I've done 3 short jogs in the last week or two.  They felt good so far.  With running I feel more prone to injury, and at 50 years of age it's important to me to steer clear of that.  Are you doing any other types of exercise? 

I miss all the old regular posters.  I wish that there was some way to have a reunion.  I felt bonded with the group here.  It seems like Numpty is the main person continuing the forum's momentum and inspiration now.

Wishing you all the best as well.

Heidi